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Old 03-23-2012, 10:41 AM   #1
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Default Warm Weather Puts Trees On Fast Forward

Warm Weather Puts Trees On Fast Forward
ScienceDaily
Mar. 19, 2012

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120319194048.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium= email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+invasivenews+%28Invasiv e+Species+News%29
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Unseasonably high temperatures have coaxed pollen from American elm trees, delicate green flowers from spicebush shrubs and a cloud of deep pink flowers from red maples, heralding the unusually early arrival of spring in central New York and reflecting a phenomenon happening across the eastern United States.

Trees and many other plants are developing flowers, and grasses are growing two to three weeks earlier than usual, raising the specter of a long and intense allergy season and concerns about what could happen to fruit crops -- both in the forest and the orchard -- if the budding fruit has to face a typical late spring frost…
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Old 03-24-2012, 01:13 AM   #2
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It also effected the Sugar Maple Season, Basically cutting it in half from what I read..Once the maples bud the hormones in the sap make it bitter. Three days of 70's pretty much opened all the buds on trees I wanted to get transplanted so I guess I missed the dormant stage except for an Oak and a few sumacs. I just checked the Arbor day site and list SE Michigan as Zone 6 which means the Wildlife food trees are on the way too.
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Old 03-24-2012, 09:52 AM   #3
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It also effected the Sugar Maple Season, Basically cutting it in half from what I read..Once the maples bud the hormones in the sap make it bitter.
Sh- shoot! I'm guessing that that will raise the price of an already expensive luxury we treat ourselves to on occasion.

I learn so much on this forum.

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Three days of 70's pretty much opened all the buds on trees I wanted to get transplanted so I guess I missed the dormant stage except for an Oak and a few sumacs. I just checked the Arbor day site and list SE Michigan as Zone 6 which means the Wildlife food trees are on the way too.
f

Yeah, I can see how that would put a damper on transplanting--you could probably still get away with it...but I'd prefer they be dormant too. I'd planned on transplanting a blueberry bush or two back in February--the ground wasn't frozen so I figured "why not?"...but, so many other things took my attention...then a few weeks ago, I decided that it might not be where I'd want them...so, I either find anothe location really quickly...or I let the idea go until next year.
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Old 03-24-2012, 10:26 AM   #4
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Given the mildness of this winter I highly doubt we are getting a frost in my area. IF it happens hopefully the invasive trees are the first to go.
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Old 03-25-2012, 10:19 AM   #5
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Gonative> “Given the mildness of this winter I highly doubt we are getting a frost in my area.” Shhhh….. don’t be jinxing us by saying something like!!! For shame for shame…. You should be knocking on wood right now for me… I’ve got fruit trees starting to bloom right now and I’m quaking in my boots over the weather!!! Just north of us they’re getting slammed, Sunshine Village in Banff Sets All-Time Snowfall Record - MarketWatch and CA got slammed again a few days ago, California snow storm knocks down 100-foot tree, kills sleeping 8-year-old girl**** - NY Daily News. If you’re watching the weather reports on the boob tube…. the west got slammed again yesterday with another foot of snow so they put out some sort of a public announcement service snow load advisory, Snow Loading Warning. We want all those folk to keep that weather out west.... far away from our fruit trees!!!
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:14 PM   #6
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Ohio is under a freeze warning for monday night gotta go cover the apple and peach blossoms.
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Old 03-25-2012, 06:58 PM   #7
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Ohio is under a freeze warning for monday night gotta go cover the apple and peach blossoms.

Forecast here showed 23 degrees for overnight Monday...I just checked back hoping they'd changed it...now it is 20 degrees! (I meant changed it for the BETTER!)

My serviceberry buds are still closed, but ready to open with any warm weather...this is not a frost we're talking about, but a freeze...does anyone know if they can survive if they don't actually open?
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Old 03-26-2012, 01:32 PM   #8
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Forecast here showed 23 degrees for overnight Monday...I just checked back hoping they'd changed it...now it is 20 degrees! (I meant changed it for the BETTER!)

My serviceberry buds are still closed, but ready to open with any warm weather...this is not a frost we're talking about, but a freeze...does anyone know if they can survive if they don't actually open?
I was talking to a naturalist about that this morning and he said most natives are adapted to this fluctuating conditions and the freeze warnings apply mostly to fruit trees and AG. crops. The service berry in my area is already in bloom so I hope he is right.
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Old 03-26-2012, 01:56 PM   #9
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I'd agree with the guy you talked to.... his redbud should be fine.... my fruit trees would probably take a beating if temps dropped down into the mid or lower '20s though. Last night there was no frost warning for us. The low was supposed to only be 33° but when I checked the online weather early this morning and my outdoor thermometer, we were at 30°. I don't see any damage and thankfully, overnight temps aren't predicted to dip below 35° tonight and then back up to the 40's overnight on Wed and Thurs. We'll see.... otherwise it's time to cover up all the saplings and fire up the outdoor stoves for the mature trees.
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:30 PM   #10
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Let's hope this freeze throws some of the invasives for a loop! The only natives I see blooming right now are a few bloodroots, which I had never known to be an especially early species before. Marsh marigolds are just ready to go, but haven't quite opened up yet. Definitely a lot of woodies have broken bud, though. I expect they'll be OK.
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