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Old 10-26-2017, 05:57 PM   #1
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Default Paw paw: My Latest Additions

Today I received three first-year seedling paw paw trees from a co-worker whose brother had extra that he grew from seeds.

I know that I am a bit north of its natural range (I am in Northeastern PA and they are from Sotheastern PA.)

Has anyone else had any success growing them north of their range?

Thanks.

Paw paw:  My Latest Additions-20171026_155019.jpg
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:23 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Today I received three first-year seedling paw paw trees from a co-worker whose brother had extra that he grew from seeds.

I know that I am a bit north of its natural range (I am in Northeastern PA and they are from Sotheastern PA.)

Has anyone else had any success growing them north of their range?

Thanks.

Attachment 45289
They grow without problem here in Northern Mass, Dap. You will have no problem growing them down there in Penn. My problem is that all of mine are sexed the same, and I get no fruit. They like to self propagate through their root systems, so even though I have as many as six trees growing, they are all clones of one another, and do nothing to increase fruit production. They are attractive trees that don't overshadow the yard with enormous size, though, so I welcome them where they are and hope that a neighbor with more motovation than I will plant one to cross pollinate with mine ...
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Old 10-28-2017, 07:17 PM   #3
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Yippie, nice catch dapjwy, those look like dandy seedlings! My seedlings [from seed from last year, or two, or three years ago] are about that size, eventho they have sprouted & grown outside all this year.[my seed remained dormant in the ground for a year or longer it seemed] Mine are already 'beginning to look like fall', but haven't dropped their leaves yet. So you might want to paint the stems or mark them somehow, so they don't accidentally get whacked during fall or springtime clean-up. The kind I have, don't seem to 'leaf-out' very early in the spring, just before May.

Those things get root growth started quick & will put down a very deep tap root, easily a foot long on those little guys now, and it will easily grow deeper a foot or more per year as the years progress. I'll bet the old Indians were glad to see a PawPaw patch, as the main stem will grow 'as straight as an arrow'.

This pix shows the lateral root that propagates additional clone trees, as Jack spoke of.Paw paw:  My Latest Additions-100_3261.jpg

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Old 10-28-2017, 08:21 PM   #4
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They grow without problem here in Northern Mass, Dap. You will have no problem growing them down there in Penn. My problem is that all of mine are sexed the same, and I get no fruit. They like to self propagate through their root systems, so even though I have as many as six trees growing, they are all clones of one another, and do nothing to increase fruit production. They are attractive trees that don't overshadow the yard with enormous size, though, so I welcome them where they are and hope that a neighbor with more motovation than I will plant one to cross pollinate with mine ...
Thanks, Jack. Good to know.

After posting, I did a search of the site and found an old post from you. That made me think that I should have no problem down here in PA.

If I'm remembering right, you did get one or two fruits (that seemed to magically appear as your friend pointed them out). I guess you haven't had any more since then? (...or am I thinking of someone else's post.)
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:30 PM   #5
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Yippie, nice catch dapjwy, those look like dandy seedlings! My seedlings [from seed from last year, or two, or three years ago] are about that size, eventho they have sprouted & grown outside all this year.[my seed remained dormant in the ground for a year or longer it seemed] Mine are already 'beginning to look like fall', but haven't dropped their leaves yet. So you might want to paint the stems or mark them somehow, so they don't accidentally get whacked during fall or springtime clean-up. The kind I have, don't seem to 'leaf-out' very early in the spring, just before May.

Those things get root growth started quick & will put down a very deep tap root, easily a foot long on those little guys now, and it will easily grow deeper a foot or more per year as the years progress. I'll bet the old Indians were glad to see a PawPaw patch, as the main stem will grow 'as straight as an arrow'.

This pix shows the lateral root that propagates additional clone trees, as Jack spoke of.Attachment 45290

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Thank you for the additional information, wildwatcher.

Yes, I am excited.

I didn't realize that they had taproots. Maybe I should put them into the ground now (I just read, the other day, that they are best transplanted in the spring). Being in pots, I think that I could plant them this fall.

If I do, I plan to put wire fence cages around them to protect them from browsing. That should keep them protected from my own potential accidental damage as well.
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:34 PM   #6
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Jack (or anyone else growing paw paw outside of its natural range),

Have you seen any zebra swallowtail butterflies or caterpillars coming to your trees?
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:46 PM   #7
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Thanks, Jack. Good to know.

After posting, I did a search of the site and found an old post from you. That made me think that I should have no problem down here in PA.

If I'm remembering right, you did get one or two fruits (that seemed to magically appear as your friend pointed them out). I guess you haven't had any more since then? (...or am I thinking of someone else's post.)
No,that was me. One year one fruit formed. I was waiting for it to ripen, and when I went out to get it, it was gone. I have no idea how that occurred, though.
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Old 10-29-2017, 05:07 PM   #8
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Congratulations. I just purchased 5 pawpaw trees. The last two summers I saw one zebra swallowtail. This summer none. �� I'm hoping to attract them with my trees
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Old 10-29-2017, 07:34 PM   #9
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Hi dapjwy, if they were mine, I would put them in now, as I think the root will be growing during the cold months...but I'm just guessing at that. Those size baby plants will have hairy roots, try not to damage those hairs.

Oh yes they have a very long tap root, it is white on the inside but black on the outside, smooth almost devoid of hair type roots, until you get near the tip of the root. I've attempted to transplant some 5' tall babies from the wild, and easily I dug over 5', and I never did get to the tip! Sadly I snap it off while pulling & digging, which I think is what killed the transplant, but hey it might of been the wrong time of year or something. But geewhiz, I wasn't about to dig more than one hole that deep just to transplant one[post hole digger works great]....so I like the seed propagation, unless you can catch the little guys in the wild while quite small, like what you have now.

That reminds me, I've got to go back down to the bottoms of the ravine, and see if any of my seed down there have grown up. I don't get a lot of fruit either, and luckily my wife doesn't like PawPaw, so I just eat the few at a time while I'm out looking for the things. I plant all the seeds at that time, if you do collect seed, it is real important not to let them dry out, so I plant them right away,~~ as far as I know~~.

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Old 10-29-2017, 09:19 PM   #10
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No,that was me. One year one fruit formed. I was waiting for it to ripen, and when I went out to get it, it was gone. I have no idea how that occurred, though.
Hmmm...sorry that it was just a one time thing.
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