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Old 01-06-2009, 09:29 PM   #1
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Default Welcome to the Wildlife Photo Tips Forum

In keeping with our Mission Statement, it wouldn't be appropriate to discuss how to take photos of our pets, people, or vacations however discussions of how to photograph native flora and fauna, natural landscaping, and related camera questions are appropriate.

Enjoy.
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Old 02-08-2009, 08:06 PM   #2
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First, please understand I am an amateur photographer and use a P&S (point and shoot) though not a compact. It's a Panasonic Lumix FZ18 I'll share some easy tips anyone can use.

When shooting wild life, eye contact with the camera can make a better shot as in this one that won the January contest.
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Old 02-08-2009, 08:48 PM   #3
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Default Two for the Price of One

Either mated pairs or even just two make for interesting shots.
#2 Red-tailed Hawks mating
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Old 02-08-2009, 10:47 PM   #4
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If you are an amateur photographer, I am an amateur gardener.

I bought a PowerShot. Many people seem to have one of those. I figured go with a popular camera others were using and be able get help. I seem to have problems photographing anything that moves. Your photo of the squirrels is one of my favorites. I saw that a while ago and it is a photo we have here somewhere in one of the forums. I love that photo.
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Old 02-09-2009, 12:08 PM   #5
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Thanks, Lorax. Powershots are great cameras!

As we were leaving the zoo one day, I spotted something out of the corner of my eye, and I stopped and looked at a tree to my right. Then I saw the hole where the squirrels were sticking their little heads out. I just started snapping!

In that we go out looking for something to shoot, we've found the necessity of always having the camera settings ready for the condition so we can shoot fast, and not lose good opportunities having to futz with the settings.
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Old 02-09-2009, 01:39 PM   #6
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I have a friend who has a ranch house. They did not remove any of the hickory trees around their home. There are many nooks and crannies for animals. They have squirrels and screech owls in their trees. One evening at dusk the little screech owls were poking their heads out waiting for their mother to bring back dinner. My friends helped me get up on their roof with a ladder to try to get closer to take photos. I did not fall off but I did not get any photos either. They were too far away for my flash to hit them. I did have fun. There they were staring out at me from their hole and there I was staring back at them. Their little swivel heads would spin down to where my friends were standing on the ground then back up to me on their roof. They have no fear. I considered moving the ladder closer to the hole to stand up on the top to get in closer with my flash. The chorus line on the ground said no.
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:18 PM   #7
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The things we do for great shots! LOL I'm new here but enjoying the site a lot and especially like this forum. I love shooting pics of wildlife, although mine is mostly limited to birds, squirrels, chipmunks, lizards and such. Lots of woods around me, but also LOTS of hunters roaming them during winter. Now that the season is over, I hope to get out into the woods a bit and see what I can find. I've only been in this house for about 9 months and haven't had a chance to do much exploring.

Anyway, my reason for posting was to ask how high you can set the ISO on your camera? You may be able to shoot some in low light without the flash. Although The shots are more grainy, you can clean them up a lot with post processing. Just a thought for next time you find an owl nest.
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:48 PM   #8
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The things we TRY TO do to get any picture!

This afternoon I discovered a wonderful nest of leaves being built in one of my trees. The squirrels did a really nice job and they were both up there at the same time. One of them had a mouth full of leaves. It was so cute. I did my stealth walk out through the garage and thought I was being really quiet. I wasn't. The minute I came around the corner one jumped into another tree and the other scurried down the other side of the tree. I can get a great photo of the nest if anyone is interested.

I am afraid I would not know where to set the ISO or how high it can go. I downloaded a manual and it still is not sinking in for me. I think I will have to be content with automatic settings.

If anyone is interested in seeing a great shot of a new squirrel nest, let me know.

I've mostly got the same subjects you have other than you could swap the lizards for salamanders, frogs, and toads.
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:52 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Im4dabirds View Post
my reason for posting was to ask how high you can set the ISO on your camera? You may be able to shoot some in low light without the flash. Although The shots are more grainy, you can clean them up a lot with post processing. Just a thought for next time you find an owl nest.
Good suggestion for Lorax! Lorax, can you insert a link to your exact camera model?
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:55 PM   #10
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I have the Canon PowerShot S2 IS.
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