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Old 03-19-2013, 08:50 PM   #1
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Default De-exinction

After seeing a promo for a news program planning on discussing the ethics of bringing species back from extinction, I did a search and found this article. I thought maybe others would be interested as well.

Bringing Extinct Species Back to Life - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:27 PM   #2
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I've always regretted being born too late to see a Carolina parakeet, but I can see problems here.
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Old 03-21-2013, 10:10 AM   #3
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Yeah, messing with Mother Nature usually produces some nasty complications.
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Old 03-23-2013, 11:47 AM   #4
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I can see a huge number of issues with this. They could potentially bring back a few clones of an individual they have DNA for from an extinct species, but who would they breed with? This would not reestablish the species and would be good only for curiosity value. To preserve a species you need genetic diversity, and a few cloned individuals cannot have this.

I agree with the Carolina parakeet, and would also love to have seen passenger pigeons. Escaped exotic parakeets are thriving in much of the south, and there is speculation that the reason they are doing so well is that the fill the niche left by the Carolina parakeet.
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Old 03-23-2013, 12:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
They could potentially bring back a few clones of an individual they have DNA for from an extinct species, but who would they breed with? This would not reestablish the species and would be good only for curiosity value. To preserve a species you need genetic diversity, and a few cloned individuals cannot have this.
I thought the same thing about lack of genetic diversity. Unless they have many multiple sources of DNA of a particular species.
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Old 04-06-2013, 01:10 AM   #6
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pawprint I might try de-extinction, just for fun

What about 'ozark chinkapin', an chestnut tree, that thrived mainly in the south up till a disease, & other stuff hit them and other native chestnut trees and they are nearly extinct now, except for some suckers growing off of stumps, and some disease resistant selected types that are providing a little seed for further propagation. I guess that concerns me, having never seen one, but I have heard of them around here, you know...from what people have told me.

But I'm a little curious if I can find some to grow on my place. There is one place called Ozark Chinquapin Foundation that may provide a way, maybe I will get a chance try a few, I know I have the right dirt for them. Might be a fun experiment, albeit not a lot of genetic diversity available.

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Old 04-06-2013, 07:57 AM   #7
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ww,

As so often happens, most people think of the animal kingdom and forget about plants...I wonder how applying this to plants lost to human interference would change the debate.

I've never seen the American chestnut except from pictures, but like you, I've read about and heard about them. As I mentioned in another head or two, I purchased one from a breeding program. It is supposed to be genetically close to 90% the American species...so, should my "I've never seen one." statement stand or not?

I hope you get to try your experiment.
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Old 04-12-2013, 11:58 AM   #8
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Just because we can do something doesn’t mean we should.
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