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Old 07-03-2018, 06:41 PM   #281
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THAT'S where you need to put your seating. Overlooking your fish!
Bluegills Hmmmm They tend to overpopulate and runt out REAL quick unless you purchase sterile stock. Take your time, pick more brains info info info....

If you intend upon catching and eating a few fish every now and then...Small or large mouth Bass (I prefer the small) are a nice choice. If not they still make for a grrat choice as they get real friendly and will follow you pond side in hopes of you scaring up a frog their way. Fun to watch spawn, protect and rear their young. You can even toss them a worm or two.... insects whatever unless doing so is against your grain.

I hear some people add tilapia but I do not know how large a pond they need nor how big they get....TROUT would probably be out as they area COOL water fish.... Bull heads are cute little bugger but will eat you out of house and home. Hmmmm Croppies???? That's another small fish but if it's too warm might get those little black dots-parasites. Then again if you really want to SEE the fish a couple of goldfish or bigger yet, Koi but obviously they are not native soooo I'm sure you'd bump those.

How much cover will be around or over the pond is something to consider as well as there are a LOT of predatory birds and ducks that will fish you dry in a heartbeat. By By Moola! Adding a couple of water lilies WILL provide hiding spots as well as close overhanging plantings. THINK before you plant....You do NOT want much of anything deciduous very close or the fallen leaves will pollute it as they decompose. Something with small leaves that tend to blow away is nice, Taller native perennials exceptionally good! Floating logs WILL provide a way out for anything that may fall in..Birds and Toads!

Have you thought about how or where the rain may flow into your pond or where an overflow route might need to be put in place in case of tormenting rain??? You may need some of those big rocks set uphill a bit to detour such a challenge another route downhill preventing a possible gully or wash out.

Nuff food for thought???
Plenty of food for thought. Thank you.

Great point about the bluegills...I have had mixed feelings about them the whole time. I think, to start with, I will just get some native minnows.

I am not a big fish eater, and I would not be comfortable catching and killing them, so bass are out.

I have as already begun planning for a rock overhang in the deep end to allow for escaping predators and the sun. If, my fish end up attracting kingfishers, herons, or other predators, I may find that bluegills and their tendency to overpopulate may end up being a plus.

I plan to get minnows from a bait shop. I am still trying to figure out which ones.

Thanks for the feedback.
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Old 07-03-2018, 06:47 PM   #282
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Now that I think of it I THINK the bluntnose minnow also likes cool water. Goes belly up if the water gets too warm. If I were you...
I'd fill your tiers up and take a few temperature readings as your Summer progresses before tossing your Fish-n-chips in.

Baby steps... Next year will be soon enough. Your water and it's bacterial beginnings need to build before setting in the fish or you may get what's called a rebound effect altering it's PH towards the toxic side. It needs time to build up the natural bacteria that will go on to change the ammonia-fish wastes into something more fish friendly.... (depending upon how many fish you initially add)

If your're eager...Just a FEW fish in it's early stage is best but remember
THE most important thing to think about before you make a choice is what will its high temperature be?
Another thing to think about is....WHAT type of water movement does your fish of choice like...Flowing or more sedentary?
Will there be eddies for rest? If not... A few big rocks detouring the current may add such a resting place.

You will begin to discover such things when you're resting pond side on that big ole rock overlooking your accomplishment.

Temperature and water flow versus fish's needs have been on my mind. I am still in the research stage.

I plan to inoculate the new pond with water from an established pond. I guess you are right, no rush...but, now that I decided to add fish, I can't wait to start watching them.
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Old 07-04-2018, 10:02 PM   #283
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Aerial view...

Planning a Streambed, Pond, and Possibly a Bog-screenshot_20180704-225946_drive.jpg

Planning a Streambed, Pond, and Possibly a Bog-screenshot_20180704-225844_drive.jpg
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Old 07-04-2018, 11:40 PM   #284
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What are you doing? Standing on your roof!
Top left where it begins uphill???
No need to knock bass off your list just because you don't eat fish. They're lots of fun to watch!

Ducks are the biggest culprits eating up the fish in the pond but....I bought a big blue heron decoy at the sports shop and that kept them out. A great horned owl decoy or a white egret also works! Not too shabby to look at either and looks quite natural. You can also add fake floating water lilies. The frogs love em to hang out in and provides a nice float for the toads to hang onto whilst paddling about. Gives them a rest spot till they find a log to crawl all the way out. Without a few floaters they would perish as I'm assuming they can only bloat up with air for so long to stay buoyant before they tire and go under for the count
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:54 PM   #285
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
What are you doing? Standing on your roof!
Top left where it begins uphill???
No need to knock bass off your list just because you don't eat fish. They're lots of fun to watch!

Ducks are the biggest culprits eating up the fish in the pond but....I bought a big blue heron decoy at the sports shop and that kept them out. A great horned owl decoy or a white egret also works! Not too shabby to look at either and looks quite natural. You can also add fake floating water lilies. The frogs love em to hang out in and provides a nice float for the toads to hang onto whilst paddling about. Gives them a rest spot till they find a log to crawl all the way out. Without a few floaters they would perish as I'm assuming they can only bloat up with air for so long to stay buoyant before they tire and go under for the count
Not standing on the roof. My husband is a big boy with a big boy's toy--he bought a drone (well, we did...but he is the one who flies it--I stick to a small, cheaper model). It is great for taking aerial shots of the property and the changes I make to it.

Planning a Streambed, Pond, and Possibly a Bog-20180705_203821.jpg

I will use a flexible liner and create a gently sloping shore on one side so animals can get in and out easily...and birds can bathe. I would like to grow the native water lily eventually...as well as other submerged and emergent plants.

If ducks showed up for a day here and there, I would be thrilled...but if they take up residence, I think it would be a huge mess. The pond is for wildlife as well as me...but, if all of my plants are eaten, and the fish can't maintain a breeding population,I guess I would not be happy.

I love blue herons, so I will keep that in mind. Actually, I wouldn't mind having a blue heron visit on occasion...but I do have mixed feelings about that. Same with kingfishers. I do plan to add a submerged rock ledge to provide a hiding spot for the fish, not sure that will be enough to protect them.
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:19 PM   #286
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The original pond is at the top of the hill within view of our bay window. The pond has a leak in the shallow end...and has filled with sediment and muck (perfect for wetland plants). It needs reworked (and I will use them muck in my future wetland). A couple of years ago, I added a liner and a dry-creekbed-type path--it's supposed to direct rain into the small pond...but until I rework the pond, the liner spilling into the pond is still exposed. These are all near the top of the slope. Planning a Streambed, Pond, and Possibly a Bog-20180705_211830.jpg
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Old 07-05-2018, 09:32 PM   #287
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Ahhhh now I see.
My oh my how your landscape's matured since I saw it. Everything's so big! You're getting her.
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Old 07-06-2018, 12:11 PM   #288
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Ahhhh now I see.
My oh my how your landscape's matured since I saw it. Everything's so big! You're getting her.
Thank you! It is getting there...slowly.

As the tree species I put in start to mature, the water features get done, and the native meadow planted, it will finally come together and start to resemble my vision for the place.
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Old 07-13-2018, 01:23 PM   #289
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From today...

Planning a Streambed, Pond, and Possibly a Bog-20180713_142149.jpg
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Old 07-13-2018, 09:34 PM   #290
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I don't know if this interests you but instead of digging with a shovel you might want to check into renting a mini-excavator.
I rented one for pulling stumps and if I recall correctly it was $135/6hrs + $50 for pick-up and delv. + cost of fuel (diesel) used = less than $200.


It'll make your work incredibly easier and you might find it fun!!!


Just a thought.
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