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Old 03-27-2010, 09:39 AM   #41
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Not Norway maple - Norway spruce. I've been killing all the Norway maples on or near my property. LOL
...
That's gotta bump you up to at least a 9.7.
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:47 AM   #42
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My ploy is this: I've planted native substitutes along side the row of syriacus, and when they get large enough, I plan to remove the syriacus and hope whe won't notice the change!
There are two mature (read old) Hibiscus/Rose of Sharon near the house. I inherited them from the previous owner. I've never liked them and have wanted to take them out and replace them with something, but have put it off. I didn't realized it was invasive--just look out of place. I've not seen any seedlings or others blooming on the two acres or beyond. Maybe they are not so bad this far north? It doesn't matter to me; I want them out regardless!

Also, have a few peonies--that I'd like gone. Eventually, I'd like to have the entire 2 acres pure natives (but done attractively). Will I ever attain this, not sure. Probably unrealistic, at least in the next several years.

What are you replacing yours with? (I don't need anything that resembles the Hibiscus--luckily, I'm not trying to fool anyone.) ;-)
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Old 03-27-2010, 10:33 AM   #43
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H. syriacus isn't a horrible invasive, but it has naturalized in spots:

PLANTS Profile for Hibiscus syriacus (rose of Sharon) | USDA PLANTS

I've actually never seen it in the wild around here. Along the Potomac River I have seen it in the wild. Frankly, daffodils are probably more invasive in WNY - and I'm not kidding. They are becoming a common sight in the interior of even some old-growth forests.
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Old 03-27-2010, 12:13 PM   #44
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amelanchier, I wonder if the daffodils were planted there by some well meaning but
ill informed person. You don't know how many people confess or are caught planting
in the local preserve I volunteer for.
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Old 03-27-2010, 04:11 PM   #45
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H. syriacus isn't a horrible invasive, but it has naturalized in spots:

PLANTS Profile for Hibiscus syriacus (rose of Sharon) | USDA PLANTS

I've actually never seen it in the wild around here. Along the Potomac River I have seen it in the wild. Frankly, daffodils are probably more invasive in WNY - and I'm not kidding. They are becoming a common sight in the interior of even some old-growth forests.

That is just one more good reason to get rid of it. It hasn't been a priority because I have more serious invasives to focus on first, but I may just get rid of these two this year.

Speaking of daffodils, though they look pretty in a bouquet, I really hate seeing them being naturalized anywhere. There are several varieties in the flower beds here (not my doing). Honestly, I don't want them, but I did just pick some for a vase, because we have friends coming over--normally I would rather make a bouquet with a few natives.


Hmmm...do I have to reconsider my rating of 8?
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Old 03-27-2010, 06:10 PM   #46
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I'm pretty sure at least some of the daffs I see are naturalized. At Goat Island at Niagara Falls for instance, there are extensive daffodil plantings outside the forests for some reason. In the interior, you'll see a scattered daffodil here and there among the garlic mustard. Same thing at the local university's little forest.
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Old 03-27-2010, 08:39 PM   #47
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amelanchier, I wonder if the daffodils were planted there by some well meaning but
ill informed person. You don't know how many people confess or are caught planting
in the local preserve I volunteer for.
My daffodils are busy "naturalizing", as I see new single plants coming up around the meadow each year. They are following the lead of the common orange lily...
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Old 03-28-2010, 04:44 AM   #48
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Well, if the daffodils are naturalizing by spreading on their own to new spots then they'll have to go on the invasive list for me and be eradicated from my garden. I have only seen them increase in thicker clumps were they were originally planted and then need to be thinned. I unfortunately have a huge spring display of daffodils that originally covered the whole front garden. Slowly I have removed some when I plant natives in that area.

I have not noticed a problem in the forest preserve yet.
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Old 03-28-2010, 08:19 AM   #49
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What a great topic!

I went down the road and stole (picked) some daffodils for a vase just the other day -- none here, and I won't be tempted to plant any as long as there are abandoned homesites to steal from every March!

Orange daylilies, on the other hand -- that's a food crop for us as well as being pretty. Is there any way to contain them?

I don't know that I have a rating yet. I'm erring on the side of Hippocrates on this new property of ours (first do no harm). I haven't planted anything outdoors, just some turnip greens and a cherry tomato on the windowsill.

I've pulled some tiny privet I found sprouting near the road, and we're cutting out Japanese honeysuckle where it's growing in the thin area of the woods (that's conveniently on a south-facing slope, so it will eventually be the house site). We're going to great lengths to avoid large trees in our construction -- the house site is an area that must've been logged in the last 20 years and there's an old logging road on which we're going to base the driveway.

There were some non-native foundation plants along the front of the trailer, but the dogs have very effectively killed those for me -- some sort of ornamental grasses, I think, that didn't respond well to being a dog highway. There's a huge evergreen bush at the end, outside the dog's fence, that I'll take out eventually, but not while we're living in the trailer -- it shades the one wall that isn't shaded by the woods in summer, so I think it's a net gain, environmentally, as long as we have to cool this place. It also isn't going anywhere. There's a little bit of grass that's mostly weeds in front of the trailer, but the dogs are taking care of that for me, too. Much of it is/was dandelion, arrowhead sorrel, and native violets, anyway.

Other than that unknown evergreen (looks like some sort of holly) and the doomed honeysuckle, we're on twenty acres of oak and hickory forest with virtually no non-natives (that I can detect with my non-expert eyes, at least). The small trees are mostly dogwood, there's greenbrier and huckleberry, the trout lillies are about to bloom.

Through luck and prolonged shopping for land to buy last year, I'd say I've happened on a piece of property that's about a 9, but that I didn't do much to get it that way. I'll be cutting honeysuckle for several years, trying to wear it out -- it doesn't really get enough light, so I think this may work). But I'll also be planting non-native vegetables in a clearing next year if not this. Call me lucky and well-intentioned, and put me about a 5.

When we move from the trailer and tear it down, I plan to plant blight-resisitant chestnut in the clear area where it sits. Then I think my score will go up, but that's several years off.
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Old 03-28-2010, 10:33 AM   #50
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Well, if the daffodils are naturalizing by spreading on their own to new spots then they'll have to go on the invasive list for me and be eradicated from my garden. I have only seen them increase in thicker clumps were they were originally planted and then need to be thinned. I unfortunately have a huge spring display of daffodils that originally covered the whole front garden. Slowly I have removed some when I plant natives in that area.

I have not noticed a problem in the forest preserve yet.
Well, the alternative is to deadhead or mow them. That's what I do - daffs aren't very attractive anyway once the flowers die.
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