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Old 04-04-2009, 08:56 PM   #21
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amelanchier! What's that saying... you've come a long way baby! Beyond impressive list of plants you are using to revegetate your landscape. The grasses you included are well chosen.
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Old 04-05-2009, 10:19 AM   #22
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amelanchier! What's that saying... you've come a long way baby! Beyond impressive list of plants you are using to revegetate your landscape. The grasses you included are well chosen.
The only trouble is that now I have to become an expert in grass ID's. :eek: I'm already eyeing the cool-season grasses starting to emerge in various points and thinking, Is that the bottlebrush grass, or is that the Kentucky bluegrass I battled last year?
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Old 04-05-2009, 01:45 PM   #23
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Grass identification? Take a tranquilizer then start your journey into grass identification. Drink lots of coffee and stay up with grass samples spread out on your kitchen table into all hours of the night.
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Old 04-05-2009, 02:49 PM   #24
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I appreciate the offer! I'd be happy to send something in return. I'm getting a number of tree & shrub seedlings in 2 weeks, most of them destined for the utility land, & could easily spare some of these species:

Amelanchier canadensis
Prunus serotina
Sambucus canadensis
Cornus sericea
Spring hasn't fully arrived in my area, so I haven't done any digging in the garden yet, but I should be out there this week. PM me your address, and I'll get them on their way.

Thank you for your offer of the shrub/tree seedlings; a couple of prunus serotina would be great. I've wanted to try a different approach to using them in the landscape for some time. Now I realize that some to the tree people on this forum will be agahst :eek:, but I am thinking of using them more like a short-lived perennial forb or small shrub than a tree.

Prunus serotina ranks very high on Tallamy's list of valuable plants in terms of supporting biodiversity (#2 in the Mid-Atlantic region - 456 lepidoptera species supported). It is a host plant for many species of butterfly; but one that is not often suggested in butterfly gardening articles because it is a tree. But if it was treated/usable as a small shrub or forb, a lot more people would consider it for their butterfly garden.

So my approach will be to keep it small. Either by periodically cutting out the main trunk(s) to keep it small, or by replacing it when it reaches a certain size. Actually, for my second idea, I will plant a new tree every few years and remove the oldest one when it's size becomes unsuitable for the location.

Prunus serotina seems especially suited for this kind of experiment. It flowers and fruits at a young age, and it will also serve the lepidoptera's needs at a young age. It should also reduce the concern for any disease problems associated with this tree.

Just realized that I've made a very long response to a simple transaction; but sometimes an idea is just ready to burst out.
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Old 04-05-2009, 09:39 PM   #25
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Spring hasn't fully arrived in my area, so I haven't done any digging in the garden yet, but I should be out there this week. PM me your address, and I'll get them on their way.

Thank you for your offer of the shrub/tree seedlings; a couple of prunus serotina would be great. I've wanted to try a different approach to using them in the landscape for some time. Now I realize that some to the tree people on this forum will be agahst :eek:, but I am thinking of using them more like a short-lived perennial forb or small shrub than a tree.

Prunus serotina ranks very high on Tallamy's list of valuable plants in terms of supporting biodiversity (#2 in the Mid-Atlantic region - 456 lepidoptera species supported). It is a host plant for many species of butterfly; but one that is not often suggested in butterfly gardening articles because it is a tree. But if it was treated/usable as a small shrub or forb, a lot more people would consider it for their butterfly garden.

So my approach will be to keep it small. Either by periodically cutting out the main trunk(s) to keep it small, or by replacing it when it reaches a certain size. Actually, for my second idea, I will plant a new tree every few years and remove the oldest one when it's size becomes unsuitable for the location.

Prunus serotina seems especially suited for this kind of experiment. It flowers and fruits at a young age, and it will also serve the lepidoptera's needs at a young age. It should also reduce the concern for any disease problems associated with this tree.

Just realized that I've made a very long response to a simple transaction; but sometimes an idea is just ready to burst out.
Great idea... I don't have room for a full-sized black cherry - these were intended for the utility land next door - but if one can successfully keep it down to shrub size with judicious pruning, that would be fantastic, as these are attractive trees.

I'll PM you re the trade...
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Old 04-05-2009, 09:44 PM   #26
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My wife took these today; can you tell how much better she is at photography? Lots of green shoots - and the first blooms!

1. Aquilegia canadensis - red columbine
2. Monarda media - purple bergamot
3. Viola labradorica - Labrador violet
4. Phlox maculata - wild sweetwilliam
5. Mystery sprout! Does anyone recognize this? I really have no idea.

Edit: I think #5 might be Mertensia virginica, Virginia bluebells.
Attached Thumbnails
My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-aquilegia.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-monarda.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-viola.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-phlox.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-mysterysprout.jpg  


Last edited by amelanchier; 04-06-2009 at 11:06 AM. Reason: new speculation
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Old 04-05-2009, 09:52 PM   #27
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1. Dicentra canadensis - squirrel corn
2. Dicentra cucullaria - Dutchman's breeches
3. Hepatica nobilis var. acuta - Hepatica in bloom - I guess at least one plant did survive the winter
4. Physostegia virginiana - obedient plant
5. Another mystery sprout. The young leaves remind me strongly of an Asclepias (milkweed). Could be either Asclepias incarnata or Asclepias tuberosa, but there's a puzzle there - I didn't plant either of those as plants, I sowed seeds of them over the winter. Surely neither would have germinated and grown true leaves by now? I don't see widespread germination anywhere else yet, after all. Perhaps it's something that germinated in the fall & quickly went dormant, a result of reseeding by one of the established plants. In that case, I would lean toward Joe Pye weed I guess.
Attached Thumbnails
My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-dicentra-canadensis.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-dicentra-cucullaria.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-hepatica.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-physostegia.jpg   My re-wilding project in the Niagara Frontier-possible-milkweed.jpg  

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Old 04-06-2009, 01:09 PM   #28
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You really have been working your buns off on your property. You have many wonderful plants to show for all the time you have spent planning and planting. I am still in shock at how far you have come in such a short period of time. If there was an award for a native plant newbie, you would win hands down.
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Old 04-06-2009, 02:20 PM   #29
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Quote:
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You really have been working your buns off on your property. You have many wonderful plants to show for all the time you have spent planning and planting. I am still in shock at how far you have come in such a short period of time. If there was an award for a native plant newbie, you would win hands down.
LOL - Well, I've definitely been bitten by the bug, even more so now than ever before I think. This is the first time I can recall having trouble concentrating at work because I wanted to rush back to the garden & see how things are coming along! There's finally enough happening that I could spend hours each day out there investigating & fussing.
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Old 04-06-2009, 02:36 PM   #30
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What an exciting project!
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anemone canadensis, aralia nudicaulis, arisaema triphyllum, asclepias incarnata, asclepias tuberosa, eupatorium purpureum, fieldstone, gaultheria procumbens, geranium maculatum, native flowers, native garden, native north american flowers, native plant, native plants, natural environment, niagara frontier, north american flowers, north american native plants, re-wilding project, restoration, rewilding project, sorghastrum nutans, spiraea alba latifolia, symphoricarpos albus, woodland

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