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Old 02-19-2009, 10:21 PM   #1
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Default Lupinus perennis scarification

ANyone out there have any quick tricks of the trade for scarifying this seed... it's so small. I'm supposed to use a razor blade to nick each seed. Ha, I want to keep my fingertips attached to my hand. You can rub it between sandpaper but I lose seed that way. There has to be a trick to this. This is the only plant for larvae of the Karner Blue. I need more of this plant.
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:59 AM   #2
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This is from the USDA Forestry Service website. My take on it - if you get 72% germination with no special treatment, and get 100% with the razor but risk losing body parts, I'd plant a few extra seeds. Or you can use sulfuric acid - 90 to almost 100%

http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/p...upper/all.html

Excerpt:
Some scarification methods improve wild lupine seed germination compared to unscarified seeds, while others do not. In an experiment to determine the effects various scarification treatments, 72% of seeds in the untreated group germinated over an unspecified time period. Seeds scarified with hot water exhibited an insignificant (p>0.05) decline in percent germination (57%), while those tumble scarified with pea gravel for 2 to 3 hours showed an insignificant increase (89%). Mechanical scarification using a commercial scarifier that threw seed against an abrasive drum resulted in significant (p<0.05) declines in percent germination (52%). After 1 week Mackay and others reported less than 15% germination of unscarified wild lupine seeds, while percent germination of seeds scarified in sulfuric acid was about 90% for seeds soaked 15 minutes and approached 100% for seeds soaked ≥30 minutes. Seeds nicked using a razor blade exhibited 100% germination. Soaking wild lupine seeds in water of varying temperatures (72-212 ░F (22-100 ░C)) did not promote germination . Exposure to fire may result in large decreases in percent germination. After 90 days, Grigore and Tremer found significantly (p<0.001) lower percent germination in seeds on the surface of prescribed burned sites compared to buried and unburned seeds
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Old 02-21-2009, 10:25 AM   #3
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Careful with the sulfuric acid also, you can lose more than fingers with that stuff even in dilute form.
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Old 02-22-2009, 02:29 PM   #4
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It's local genotype seed I have. I want the germination rate to be the highest possible without risking body parts as you call it. Anyone want to scarify my seed for me
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Old 02-22-2009, 03:29 PM   #5
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Just use caution with the acid and you should get good results. Like anything else, when all else fails read and follow the directions!!
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Old 02-22-2009, 09:24 PM   #6
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Since my vision isn't the greatest any longer are you volunteering
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Old 02-23-2009, 12:15 AM   #7
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Sulfuric Acid....works great. Be careful. Wear gloves and an apron. We used this in concert with hand scarification in my propogation class. On Redbud and Gleditsia. The gleditsia that were treated with SA are up... but so are the ones treated by notching the seed with a file. The Redbud are for the most-part still asleep.
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Old 02-23-2009, 12:52 AM   #8
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I know how to use SA. I think I'd prefer to use SA rather than a razor blade.

Were you aware that ethyl alcohol can be used to break down the seed coat of many species?

The answer to the question has been provided to me by a personal friend. She told me to line the inside of a film canister with sand paper. Toss the Lupinus perennis into the canister and shake away. "Look ma, no SA"!
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Old 02-23-2009, 11:25 AM   #9
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What type of sand? Coarse, builders, play? I'm wondering if that would work with some of the magnolia grandifloras I'm trying to setup, hmmm.
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:53 PM   #10
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A cut piece of sand paper put inside the film canister. Not loose sand. You don't need to scarify M. grandiflora. Soak the whole seed pod. Change the water you soak it in every day for a few days. The little black seeds will come right out when you squish them between your fingers. They squish out the same way you squish out viburnum seeds. Soak them again for a day then plant them. I learned I was supposed to have washed the seeds off with Dawn detergent after I sowed them. Half germinated.
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