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Old 03-22-2011, 10:54 AM   #1
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Default Bluebead Lily (Clintonia borealis)

Hello,

I just recently joined this forum and I'm looking forward to discussing wildflower propagation from seed with other members. I did a fair amount of this years ago, and now that I have a garden once again, I'd like to get started.

I've successfully raised jack-in-the-pulpit, bloodroot, and American wild-ginger from seed that I'd collected, and this summer I plan to try to collect some seed once again from these species, and get started.

Some new species I'd also like to collect seed from this summer, if I can find any, are trout-lily, hepatica, red trillium, great white trillium, and I'd especially like to try bluebead lily (Clintonia borealis). I expect to be able to find some plants of the first few species by myself (though whether or not I'll be able to get some seed, I'm not sure), but I no longer know of any locations for Clintonia, though many years ago I used to be able to come across it while walking in the woods.

If anyone on this forum has some Clintonia seed that they'd be willing to share, I'd appreciate it very much. If I'm able to locate some seed plants for the other species I've mentioned, and there is some extra seed available, I'd be happy to trade it. I'll also probably be able to collect some little black-spruce seed cones during the Summer, and some redbud tree (Cercis canadensis) seed pods in the Fall, if anyone would like to trade for these. I'll also have access to ornamental Wisteria vine seed-pods in the late Fall (this is a non-native ornamental vine). Wisteria has beautiful blooms, and provides shelter and cover for native birds, but it is a non-native ornamental, so it should probably only be planted in backyards, and not in natural conservation areas, or wildlife sanctuaries. Wisteria takes 10 or 15 years to bloom when plants are grown from seed, but the vines are beautiful and worth the wait.

Thanks for any help that can be provided.
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Old 03-22-2011, 11:04 AM   #2
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Welcome to the sight Mocon!
I LOVE wildflowers! I've only ran into the clintonia while in travel, so sad to say...None to pass on to you.
Here's an area http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...urself-please/ where you can post a bit about yourself, the projects you're working on and such if You'd like to share with the gang.
AND another where you can get to KNOW the members a bit better yourself...http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for.../6091-why.html

Quote:
Wisteria takes 10 or 15 years to bloom when plants are grown from seed, but the vines are beautiful and worth the wait.
No wonder I hadn't seen any blooms! We've moved from that home years ago so they will now reap in the benefits of all my hard work.
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Old 03-22-2011, 03:29 PM   #3
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Hi, a plant person yay!!! Mostly have prairie seeds here although the Virginia bluebells are doing well and I would like to add to another place. So far seed collection and propagation has been unsuccessful for the Mertensia. Have had lots of luck with prairie plants as they are very happy in our garden.
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Old 03-23-2011, 03:51 PM   #4
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Welcome, mocon! I'm sure you'll love this informative, friendly site.

I'd be interested in discussions about wildflower propagation from seed. Starting last year, I planted seeds from wildflowers that I grow on my own property...mostly aster, butterflyweed, Penstemon, and a few others. Every year I hope to buy more natives and help propagate what I have.

I love, trout lily (what I grew up calling dog's tooth violet), Trilliums, hepatica and the like. I've heard other members mention bluebead lily (Clintonia borealis) and I'd like to add it to my list.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I'd avoid the non-native Wisteria even in backyards as they can escape into natural conservation areas, or wildlife sanctuaries. On my drive in to work, there is a huge patch of wisteria on the side of the road that is totally covering quite a few trees--kind of hard to judge while driving 65 mph...it probably covers more of an area than I realize as judging size from the car is kind of misleading.

Anyway, we look forward to hearing more about your plans, favorite trees, wildflowers, grasses, wildlife, and the like. Pictures are always welcome.

I'm so glad you found us.
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:24 PM   #5
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Hi folks,

Well, I finally located a patch of Bluebead Lily (Clintonia borealis), and have gotten about 12 berries from it. I picked them a few days ago, and would like to try sowing them. Does anyone on this forum have any advice on how to go about it ? Thanks
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:42 PM   #6
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See this post in our North American Native Plant Propgation & Winter Sowing Forum:

Clintonia borealis (Bluebead Lily) germination

Lorax posted a couple of methods for germinating clintonia borealis seeds.
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:31 PM   #7
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Thanks for the replies above. It's been about 9 years or so since I posted the question above. Since then, I've collected clintonia seeds about half a dozen times, each time from a different location, in the Fall, when the berries are bright navy blue. I've sowed them in a small plastic container, which I've left outside over the winter. I remove the pulp first, and sow the seeds. Out of perhaps two dozen seeds sown in the fall, maybe about 4 or 5 will germinate. The seedlings look like tiny blades of grass. They are very delicate. They never live long, within a month or so, they keel over and damp-off. I've tried transplanting them into a little peat-pot, transplanting them directly into a shady garden spot, or just leaving them in the original container. So far, nothing seems to work, they invariably keel over and disappear. Right now, only one seedling has germinated from the seeds I collected last year. It's tiny and delicate. I'll do my best to try to care for it. I'll probably try transplanting it out of the container as soon as possible into the garden, and see what happens.
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Old 05-17-2019, 05:51 PM   #8
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Are you hardening your lil babes off previous to their planting? Much the same as us, they need to be introduced to the sun slowly and build up resistance to it over a 2 week breaking in period of a couple hours in and out of it in a shady area or they will get fried by the sun and die.
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Old 05-17-2019, 09:28 PM   #9
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Yeah, Clintonia especially needs *cool shade*. It's a plant of hemlock-pine-birch woods. The other thing to consider is mycorrhizae. Bill Cullina recommends adding something called GA-3 to the soil of certain woodland species. I've never done that, but I have scooped a bit of the soil a plant is growing in when I harvest a seed (always in a rescue-type situation where doing so does no damage).
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