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Old 03-05-2013, 09:23 PM   #1
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Default What Can be Rooted?

I've been wanting to try rooting some things. Today I bought rooting hormone, but I've yet to do any research as to what I can root.

One thing I'd *love* to root, is the mature Amelanchier tree that is growing on our property. In the four years we've been here, I've yet to find any seedlings of it around the property. I'm not sure that it can be done, but I'd love to add more of these around the property--into the hedgerow, on the edge of the pocket woodland, and in various spots around the property.

I feel a little more hopeful with the quaking aspen--which has yet to send up any shoots. I do have three that have come up from seed that I've transplanted, but I'd like more for a grove and others for the hedgerow and to help speed up the process of creating my pocket woodland.

I would also *love* to be able to root the native rhododendron and some mountain laurel--I think I could find a source for cuttings on my friends brother's property.

Another that I have in mind is linden--from what I've read it is very difficult to grow from seed (taking up to 4 years), and then it is slow growing on top of that.

I'm sure there are others I'd like to try. What would all of you suggest? What have you had success with? I'm open to more than just what I have listed above.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:52 AM   #2
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First, this is the time to do it, and do it now while things are just dormant but about to spring to life. There is no reason not to try everything you have suggested - the only cost is a little rooting hormone and some time.

Elderberry roots instantly. Buttonbush roots well. I have had luck with multiple viburnums. Anything that suckers is likely to root well. Milkweeds root well, too, but you are looking for shrubs and trees. I did not get my azaleas to root.

If you do it now, you can take the dormant woody stem, dowse it in rooting hormone and stick it right into the ground where you want it to root, being sure there are at least three nodes below soil level for best results. Once the plant isn't dormant, you usually have to do it in a pot, in sand or other rooting media and take a lot more effort on it.

It is fun trying, and way cheaper than buying plants. Assuming you have a robust mature plant to take the cuttings from, it costs only your own labor (and in my case, less labor than trying to dig holes for nursery bought shrubs and trees!)
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:58 PM   #3
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As turttle says any clumping bushes should work

A good plant that may work is hazelnut bushes, They'll be cloned this way and Arbor day is doing it for better harvests...So if you've got a good specimen you may give it a try.

My successful plant multiplying by rooting didn't involve any rooting hormone but did involve pussy willows . Just take a long branch and bury it, After a season you'll have a rooted clone which you may move or leave it there for bird cover.

I have several now with very little work and the wildlife really like it.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:02 PM   #4
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Thanks for the fast, informative response, turttle.

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Originally Posted by turttle View Post
First, this is the time to do it, and do it now while things are just dormant but about to spring to life. There is no reason not to try everything you have suggested - the only cost is a little rooting hormone and some time.
I thought now was the best time. Thank you for confirming it and lighting a fire under me, so I don't miss my chance and have to wait a full year for the ideal time to come around again.


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Elderberry roots instantly.
Very good to hear!

I have several bushes already, and a few more have seeded around. I know transplanting them makes them wilt badly, and the one I tried early spring two years ago, didn't seem to take.

I definitely want more for various spots around the property including the hedgerow--heck, I've got to figure out what to call my other sections...I'd really like to have a network of "hedgerows or hedgerow-like sections" not only bordering the property but bordering some paths within the property as well.

I will try to root a few from each bush so that I don't clone only one--I'll feel a little better about the diversity (well, several lines of clones at least)...and they will continue to seed themselves which will create more genetic diversity.

There is a red elderberry, Sambucus racemosa, across the street in the shoulder of the road--originally I planned to try to grow it from seed this year, but I think rooting would be easier and give me faster results. This was never a favorite of mine, but I'm not just planting for me...so hopefully the birds will enjoy it...and I'll learn to appreciate this elderberry as well.

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Originally Posted by turttle View Post

If you do it now, you can take the dormant woody stem, dowse it in rooting hormone and stick it right into the ground where you want it to root, being sure there are at least three nodes below soil level for best results. Once the plant isn't dormant, you usually have to do it in a pot, in sand or other rooting media and take a lot more effort on it.


Hmm...I hadn't expected to be able to get them to root directly in the ground. I will give it a try, but maybe try a few more in pots as well.

You've had success with this method? What have you rooted this way?

(I'm fine with herbaceous plants as well as the woodies...although trees and shrubs are on my mind right now--because they longer to mature.)
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprucetree View Post
A good plant that may work is hazelnut bushes, They'll be cloned this way and Arbor day is doing it for better harvests...So if you've got a good specimen you may give it a try.
I have three different hazelnut bushes that I purchased a few years ago as bare root seedlings. They are finally starting to spread, and I guess I was a little reluctant to dig up the shoots and reduce the size of the still small clumps...rooting will be a nice alternative. I feel like I'd have better luck if I just thin the shoots that are coming up...getting even a little root but not really distrubing the clump.


Quote:
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My successful plant multiplying by rooting didn't involve any rooting hormone but did involve pussy willows . Just take a long branch and bury it, After a season you'll have a rooted clone which you may move or leave it there for bird cover.

I have several now with very little work and the wildlife really like it.
Cool. I have one pussy willow in the yard. It looks pretty mature. I did try to root it (not hard to do), but it didn't survive where I put it...I have to wonder if the black walnut tree nearby may have been the culprit.

Also, being that it was planted by a previous owner, I'm not 100% sure that it is a native one or perhaps a French one purchased at a nursery.

You guys have me so psyched to start!

I'll also have to look into what shrubs I can layer.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:14 PM   #6
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I'm thrilled to think that I can propagate what I already have as well as things I don't yet have. Having such large areas to fill in, rooting seems like a good option. I will also try to grow things from seed, or get cuttings from various individuals so as to ensure some genetic diversity.

I'm still hoping for more responses. I'd love to hear people's success stories...but, I guess even things that didn't work out would be good to know as well.

I'm so psyched! (I really hope I have enough successes so that I'm not let down.)
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:52 PM   #7
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One thing nice about pussy willow is it's loaded with pollen early in the season.

Also the stems, bark, and roots have a chemical that aids rooting...All willows have
it.

It's probably a good time to order bare roots even if it is kinda muddy, I was out today and the surface was thawed but still frozen below that.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:55 PM   #8
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Last year I got some nice shots of a bumblebee on a pollen-filled pussy willow catkin. I'd like to have more.

My pond is completely thawed! I guess it was nearly thawed yesterday, but until I glanced out the window today and saw the reflections on its surface, I didn't realize the temperatures had risen so much...it's been rather frigid here recently. I'm assuming the the ground will be thawed soon too.

I want to get more bare-root seedlings, but one place sold out of one that I wanted and can't find anywhere. I think that set me back...I have to move on and find other things I want.
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:24 PM   #9
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The riparian restoration that is going on by NCBG has large berms that need to be replanted with trees. They are just putting 4-5 ft sticks into the ground and expecting them to root. When we visited there for tour guides and spoke with them about it, they said that if the wood was dormant, and you got at least three nodes into the soil, the take rate was about 75% in the species they were using.

I have done it with elderberry and sweetbox (not native) with success. In general, my soil is too hard to get anything in to three nodes.
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
The riparian restoration that is going on by NCBG has large berms that need to be replanted with trees. They are just putting 4-5 ft sticks into the ground and expecting them to root. When we visited there for tour guides and spoke with them about it, they said that if the wood was dormant, and you got at least three nodes into the soil, the take rate was about 75% in the species they were using.

I have done it with elderberry and sweetbox (not native) with success. In general, my soil is too hard to get anything in to three nodes.
I wonder what they were using. I've read about those kinds of restorations, but I can't remember which species they use.

I'll definitely try my elderberries!!! I am SO EXCITED about that!

I'll try a lot of others as well. I'm hoping the rooting hormone and (now that I know) making sure toget at least three nodes into the soil, I'll have a good bit of success.

I read a little about sweet fern, and that is supposed to be able to be rooted as well (another one I want to spread).

I'm hoping to be able to root a American sweet crabapple that I have (if I ID'd it right) on the edge of the property...and what I think is a hawthorn. (Time will tell if it will work...or maybe someone will post to tell me it should work. )
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cut, cuttings, dorman, dormant cuttings, dormant stem, elderberry, hardwood, hazlenut, hormone, progate, propagation, pussy willow, root, rooted, rootin, rooting hormone, roots, serviceberry, softwood

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