Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Natural Gardeners Unite > Mulch

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-19-2009, 09:29 AM   #1
Big Fat juicy WORM
 
doccat5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Default Cover Crops and Living Mulches for Veggie Production in the South

Another cross over subject since it not only falls under organic gardening/farming but is also a sustainable practice that is practical solution to many soil problems.

http://www.ncsu.edu/sustainable/cover/cover.html

Quote:
Cover crops are grown to protect and improve the soil, not to harvest. Cover crops have the potential to improve soil tilth, control erosion and weeds, and maintain soil organic matter. They can reduce compaction and increase water infiltration which decreases leaching of nutrients. Cover crops retain and recycle plant nutrients (especially nitrogen) between crops, provide habitat for beneficial microorganisms, and increase plant diversity.
Quote:
Cover crops are usually killed or incorporated before establishing the vegetable crop. Recently, however, there has been interest in living mulch systems where the cover crop and vegetable grow together in the field for all or part of the growing season in order to extend weed control and other cover crop benefits such as decreased traffic compaction into the growing period of the crop.
doccat5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2009, 12:51 PM   #2
WG Guardian Spirit
 
JennyC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: The South
Default

Sound practice, cheap fertilizer, erosion control, something green to look at in the winter... what's not to like?

Of course, as a small child, I always just thought my dad was planting red flowers for me in the wintertime! (Clover) So, add to that, happy small people.
JennyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2009, 01:12 PM   #3
Heron
 
LadySapphire22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

Love that idea, JennyC. And yes, cover crops are a great way to help condition the soil and add nutrients.
__________________
Lady S


There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling. ~Mirabel Osler

LadySapphire22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2009, 11:26 PM   #4
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Watch which clover you use.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2009, 07:28 AM   #5
Big Fat juicy WORM
 
doccat5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Default

Watch it do what? Grow? I should point out it pays to check out what cover crops are best for your area. Most clovers aren't that difficult to deal with, hairy vetch on the other hand is quite interesting to deal with once it gets going. Great to break up clay soil and a stone "w"itch to get turned under because of that clay breaking root system.
You do need to be selective about which red clover you pick. There is one that is used mainly for large meadow/pasture areas that can take over. But I use white clover under my fruit and nut trees as cover and it draws pollinators like crazy. Besides, it's pretty and handling mowing with no problem.
doccat5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cover, crops, living, mulches, production, south, veggie

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2