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Old 01-06-2013, 03:41 PM   #31
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Thank you to both of you for your compliments.

I did it myself - the doors and the panels on the roof though - I had help in the lifting by my husband and son. Dad gave me a lot of his wood that he had left over residing his barn, and from building our house. I did have to purchase some other stuff though to finish it - so it is not all scrap.

There is a lot I don't know about raising stuff in the real cold regions, even though I have lived in Michigan for a while; back a decade ago. But hot weather is harder on animals than the cold around here; anyway. The main thing about winter around here is to make sure everything has plenty to eat so they can make body heat.
Our geese loved it up in Michigan- I just made sure they had at least a couple of buckets of warm water once a day and a lot of corn and they managed fine in the snow. My daughter went to college up there and took a lot of bird, environmental science classes and asked why duck's feet would frost bite, but not geese - the professor and her looked it up and found out their blood came right from the heart to the feet to keep them warm.

We hatched out a lot of turkeys, cochans, and peacocks the summer before we left and got rid of them all in the fall --did not over winter them since we were going to move- I guess it was a good thing because I am sure I would have just got dog houses and not worried about it. Not being raised in that area I might have taken it for granted they would be okay as long as I fed them well, and had enough of a flock for them to huddle to keep warm. When I got rid of them -- there were tons of bird people coming out wanting them and even begging me to let them have them! So they do raise them up there- and I doubt they heat their coops?? - not sure though.

I now live in zone 6b - It can get pretty cold- it hits the single digits or below sometimes - the teens sometimes - mostly though it is the mid 20s - but it also warms up a lot too into the 40s and 50s even. So a lot of back and forth temperature. In Michigan I noticed - it gets down below freezing and stays there till April.

As far as protection:
* We are in the middle of our pastures; surrounded by cattle - that helps some.
*We also have electric fences surrounding us entirely - that helps some.
*I have dog fence up around the geese lot, and it is surrounded by electric fence --
* It does not show up very well, but around the chicken run - I have a dog fence buried about two feet down and it comes up about two feet above the ground, and is wired to the chicken wire.
*The chicken wire is wired together with pieces of electric wire (my hubby left a bunch in his pockets and ruined my washer.
* But best of all - oh best of all - I have a herd dog - a blue heeler.
Before that I had foxes, other dogs, coyotes running all over the place and it is a wonder they did not get my geese -- I guess it had to do with not wanting to tackle a big bird and the dog fence around them- because one day when our dog and husband came back from checking fence on the four wheeler - the geese were still out in the yard; not shut up yet , and they found a fox tugging on a goose's neck. I am surprised the ganders were not beating it up??? I think the fox surprised everybody with it boldness.
Our dog ran it off and the goose was okay.

*Red tail hawks are a big problem. I have chicken wire on top of the chicken run, but the roosters are not in the pen. I needed protection for them.- The light weight netting that I put on my cherry trees seem to do great for them- so far.

I do worry that coyotes might hurt our dog - they say you should keep two dogs - but we have neighbors that are willing to do their part in keeping the population down.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:32 PM   #32
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Most of my coop was done by somebody else but.... I did get to help and learned a lot.
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The dog you've got says it all. We couldn't leave a dog out year round where we are.... brrrrrrr.... too cold.
--
I've come to terms with hawks snitching. I've done what I can to discourage them. I know this is gonna sound weird but I've got a hawk's nest in a hawthorn tree real close to my run and I know come next spring... she's gonna take a chicken or 2 for her young. I'm ok with that. It's the mink I'm gonna do battle with. Mink wiped out over 30 of my meat chickens last year and.... they didn't even eat what they killed.
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Old 01-09-2013, 08:35 PM   #33
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I figured minks were probably the same as those blood sucking weasels.
Grandpa hated them.

You don't have a dog!
OH The HORROR!

Well you do have to do some training to make pups learn to leave things alone, too.

But being cold is not a dog's problem. Even our blue healer has a short wool undercoat under it's outer coat of hair. It gets so frisky in the winter - it is summer it is miserable.

And there are dog houses.

Blood sucking minks - hmmm well maybe mink coats is not a bad idea. I wonder if there were ever such a thing as weasel coats?
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Old 01-12-2013, 09:34 AM   #34
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I have dogs.... they're all house dogs. They only go out to pee and poop. What's worse is.... 1 of the dogs... the smallest of our dogs.... A German Shepherd that only weighs about 90 lbs.... would kill any chicken... or cat.... or mink she could sink her teeth into. Good thing is she doesn't sink her teeth into anything inside the house.... it's like she's off-duty.
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Old 01-12-2013, 04:22 PM   #35
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I don't know what it takes to have a good dog that don't bother stuff. But we have one.
She did give us fits when she was a puppy up till she was two years old. We were constantly yelling, holding her down, electric shock collars. I did not know if she was going to work out or not. She had so much energy that it was amazing. She loved catching the frisbie and was quite an athlete at it! We played with her a lot.

She would round up all the cattle into a small bunch. I would go out in the morning and find all 24 head all subdued and all bunched up by this little dog having a ball.

She made the bull miserable. She would grab his tail and go swinging up high in the air - the bull finally discovered if he ran by us that we would call the dog off . I found myself being searched out in the field by the bull - to get some help.

The geese she would get them down and rough them up but never killed one - but she got a lot of punishment for doing it.
So then she just chased them constantly - they were all miserable

She made sure the cat was miserable.

It was like she thought her job was to make everything on the place miserable.

Then she settled down.
She took it upon herself to watch and take care of everything?

When we got the quail she kept trying to catch them and bring the back to the cage - but she finally figured out we had let them go.

Some baby chicks got out and she took it upon herself to bring them to the back door -for us to do something with them. Wet but unharmed.

She watches out for anything that might harm anything on the place.

There was a time, I would never have thought it.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:14 PM   #36
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We get our dogs from shelters.... they're re-treads. That shepherd watches out for the people in our house... she's the 1st dog we've ever had that we think would go after the jugular of anyone she didn't know trying to get in this house. When I'm home.... she's either underfoot or walking around looking out all the windows. I think what she's doing is hardwired in her breeding.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:09 PM   #37
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that is all we have ever owned - retreads.
We have had a half chow once up on a time. He suited our needs and was a wonderful dog. They lay around on the back porch and look scary.

We decided on this blue healer because it was there for sale at a chicken fair.

I really like this breed.
WHen she first saw the cows as a puppy she shook with fear all over and ran behind me. She was scared of the bull and watched him all the time. I am not sure how things like that work? Things that are bred up like that -- the cows did awake feelings in her - but not how I would have thought?
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:18 PM   #38
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G's got a dog that's part chow. Hands off though.... she willed it to me if something ever happens to her and I get the little squirt too.
--
When ours 1st saw our chickens.... she shook alright but it wasn't with fear, This is our new non-native.....
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I gotta round up chickens and cook.... back for more fun later!!!
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:05 PM   #39
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I found the silkie hen has gone broody today.

I guess I am going to let her sit.

That is mighty early though.

They will be hatching out when-- 21 days. Today is Jan 28th.
They will hatch out Feb 17.
Will she be able to keep them warm enough?
Or will I have to fix her a place in the metal building?

I probably should go out there and take them eggs away from her shouldn't I?
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:42 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidambar View Post
Lorax gave me instructions let me see what I can do with the pictures.
Wow now that's awesome! I really like how it was done, good job !
I have a suggestion for you about the food and water, put a hook up and hange the waterer ad food on a chain , keeps all the saw dust out, or do what we did the first year, put them on bricks or cement blocks. I found that if I hang my feeders and waterers they stay very clean. I think this is an awesome coop!
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bath, behavior, broody, broody chicken, broody hen, chickens, chicks, dip, dipping, domestic chickens, eggs, hens, poultry, rooster, water

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