Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening

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-   -   Snags & how to create them (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/landscape-garden-design/8624-snags-how-create-them.html)

havalotta 06-19-2011 05:25 PM

Weed wackers do a good job at cutting through the bark....
Believe me, our young grass cutter has done a wonderful job killing our....... wanted species!
Give it a try on what you REALLY want killed.

dapjwy 06-19-2011 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havalotta (Post 92504)
Weed wackers do a good job at cutting through the bark....
Believe me, our young grass cutter has done a wonderful job killing our....... wanted species!
Give it a try on what you REALLY want killed.

LOL! Good point. (...and sorry you lost so many that you wanted.)

dapjwy 09-11-2011 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dapjwy (Post 92502)
*I've used that analogy myself, but now I'm thinking that a dessert is a unique habitat that supports a lot of life...but to the general public, I bet it is still a good analogy.


I was searching for this tread, came across a comment I'd posted earlier, and cringed when I saw my spelling error. Too late to edit the post--that button is long gone...but I'm so anal, I had to at least comment that I know how to spell desert...I was probably just craving dessert at the time of posting! ;)

dapjwy 09-11-2011 05:11 PM

Urgent (well, time sensitive anyway)
 
Anyway, the reason I was searching for this thread is that I have an opportunity to turn what will be left of a huge tree into a small, yet thick snag. Although I hate cutting down trees, this one *has to go*. It is much too close to the house, is damaging our roof, and sending suckers up all over the yard...here's hoping it hasn't reached the septic drainage field yet.

We are in the process of getting a new roof put on (seven days straight of rain did nothing to speed up the process). In addition to that, we are having this enormous tree cut down... unfortunately, my car decided to die on me during this same week...and while looking for a replacement, Jeff's car overheated and is now in the shop. ~sigh~ We are carless, but luckily have good friends who are helping us out a LOT (even lending us one of their vehicles for now). ...But, as so often happens with me, I digress.

...The final stage of the tree's removal is supposed to happen tomorrow (this was a 3-day process that spanned more than a weeks time). Originally, I'd asked the tree service guy to leave about 8-12 feet of the trunk standing so that I could carve it into a more attractive shape. (I've no experience carving and have never touched a chainsaw in my life--however, I do have an artistic background...I also have a mild fear of heights...maybe "mild +". I'd *LOVE* to carve this into something attractive that will benefit wildlife. The problem is I am not sure that I will be able to achieve the dream, and I may end up with an eyesore. :( The guy would have to cut it off at around 15 ft...or as flush to the ground as he can. I'm concerned that I can't be up that high--wielding a chainsaw no less.

My neighbor says that if the guy drops the tree, then I carve it on terra firma, he'll get his backhoe in to help me set it upright--once he gets it fixed. I'm so unsure what to do with this...any advice would be appreciated. I've got to let him know for sure by tomorrow morning...so this is kind of time sensitive.
I'd hate to lose an opportunity to create something beautiful and useful, but I'd also hate to have an eyesore that close to the house. (the height can't be any higher without risking it falling onto the house.

jack 09-11-2011 05:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dapjwy (Post 99269)
Anyway, the reason I was searching for this thread is that I have an opportunity to turn what will be left of a huge tree into a small, yet thick snag. Although I hate cutting down trees, this one *has to go*. It is much too close to the house, is damaging our roof, and sending suckers up all over the yard...here's hoping it hasn't reached the septic drainage field yet.

We are in the process of getting a new roof put on (seven days straight of rain did nothing to speed up the process). In addition to that, we are having this enormous tree cut down... unfortunately, my car decided to die on me during this same week...and while looking for a replacement, Jeff's car overheated and is now in the shop. ~sigh~ We are carless, but luckily have good friends who are helping us out a LOT (even lending us one of their vehicles for now). ...But, as so often happens with me, I digress.

...The final stage of the tree's removal is supposed to happen tomorrow (this was a 3-day process that spanned more than a weeks time). Originally, I'd asked the tree service guy to leave about 8-12 feet of the trunk standing so that I could carve it into a more attractive shape. (I've no experience carving and have never touched a chainsaw in my life--however, I do have an artistic background...I also have a mild fear of heights...maybe "mild +". I'd *LOVE* to carve this into something attractive that will benefit wildlife. The problem is I am not sure that I will be able to achieve the dream, and I may end up with an eyesore. :( The guy would have to cut it off at around 15 ft...or as flush to the ground as he can. I'm concerned that I can't be up that high--wielding a chainsaw no less.

My neighbor says that if the guy drops the tree, then I carve it on terra firma, he'll get his backhoe in to help me set it upright--once he gets it fixed. I'm so unsure what to do with this...any advice would be appreciated. I've got to let him know for sure by tomorrow morning...so this is kind of time sensitive.
I'd hate to lose an opportunity to create something beautiful and useful, but I'd also hate to have an eyesore that close to the house. (the height can't be any higher without risking it falling onto the house.

Leaving the fifteen feet rooted will leave a nice snag. The rest you can cut into long sections and use them to border your flower gardens. Wood like that lying on the ground is also of great value to wildlife.

The branches at the top I would recommend using cleavers on. They, of course, go onto your brush pile. Hence, you'll have a fifteen foot snag, wildlife and fungus friendly borders for your path thru your meadow, and additions for your brush pile at an important time, as the harsh weather it will provide shelter from is soon to be here.

Alas, when I read the first few words of your post, I though you were going to be talking about another tree... :tease

dapjwy 09-11-2011 05:41 PM

Many branches will be chipped and used to smother the crownvetch that is taking over a section of the future meadow. Other branches, I've pulled out to use in another brush pile.

I plan to use some larger longs in the woodland, and perhaps I could add some to the meadow as well. My concern is that I can actually make it look like something attractive. I *think* I have the skill...but not sure I have the nerve to be up that high. I've I *can't* then, we'll have not only an eyesore, but also one that is resprouting to wreak more havoc.

dapjwy 09-11-2011 05:47 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Perhaps understanding the sheer size of this would help:

jack 09-11-2011 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dapjwy (Post 99275)
Perhaps understanding the sheer size of this would help:

That's going to make an interestingly shaped snag just as it is at fifteen feet. It has all that can interest the observer, and it will be a delight with all of those nooks and crannies for the wildlife. Nature has already artistically shaped that soon to be snag!

If you're concerned about it sending up sprouts, girdle it at about seven inches from the earth line.

You will have a lot of wood to decay through the years. That will be great for the fungus population of your property. Fungus rules what happens in the world of flora.

dapjwy 09-11-2011 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jack (Post 99278)
That's going to make an interestingly shaped snag just as it is at fifteen feet.


With it being cut flush on top, it will not look very natural. I plan to remedy that *if* I can get up that high with a chainsaw.

dapjwy 09-11-2011 06:52 PM

Thanks...I had gone up a ways (not too far) on a ladder and began having second thoughts. The tree guy would've like to leave it up even higher--but there is no way I'd get up that high...and if it fell it would surely hit the house. I had second thoughts and finally told him to take it down to the ground and I'd do my best to carve what was left into something--almost immediately I began to regret it and decided that I want to give my original idea a chance. Thanks to you and that article, I just called him back and told him to leave it as originally planned.

I mentioned that leaving it jagged would be better for me than a flush cut...but I'm not sure he'll be able to do that...oh well. I'd rather err on the side of a big snag than regret not having it there. $#!+! I really better be able to do this!


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