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Old 06-22-2020, 12:12 PM   #1
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Default New Book: Garden Revolution...

This book was just suggested to me by someone online.

It sounds like a great find:

Garden Revolution: How Our Landscapes Can Be a Source of Environmental Change

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1604696168..._hYm8Eb5186G1C
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Old 06-24-2020, 12:01 PM   #2
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This book is great. I've mentioned it a few times in comments here. Here are a couple interviews he did that sum up his approach
https://growinggreener.libsyn.com/la...-garden-design

https://growinggreener.libsyn.com/la...ntained-garden
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Old 06-24-2020, 05:53 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by skip1909 View Post
This book is great. I've mentioned it a few times in comments here. Here are a couple interviews he did that sum up his approach
https://growinggreener.libsyn.com/la...-garden-design

https://growinggreener.libsyn.com/la...ntained-garden
Thanks, Skip.

I have not been on as often as I like...and yesterday, I somehow left the page I was on without finishing the new comments in the thread...and couldn't find it again. Stuff like that happens too often with me.

Thanks for the links.
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Old 06-25-2020, 07:17 AM   #4
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Thanks, Skip.

I have not been on as often as I like...and yesterday, I somehow left the page I was on without finishing the new comments in the thread...and couldn't find it again. Stuff like that happens too often with me.

Thanks for the links.
Yeah no problem, they're short for a podcast, 30 minutes. I find it easier to listen to a radio show than to watch or read while I'm driving or doing whatever (not that I read or watch videos while driving). The host is more formal than I like but he has a lot of good guests.
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Old 07-03-2020, 06:13 AM   #5
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Yeah no problem, they're short for a podcast, 30 minutes. I find it easier to listen to a radio show than to watch or read while I'm driving or doing whatever (not that I read or watch videos while driving). The host is more formal than I like but he has a lot of good guests.
I know what you mean...but I did laugh at your disclaimer.

I really need to look into it...but I've yet to do the whole podcast thing.
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Old 07-04-2020, 11:14 AM   #6
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I know what you mean...but I did laugh at your disclaimer.

I really need to look into it...but I've yet to do the whole podcast thing.
I enjoyed Larry Weiner's podcasts, and I will eventually purchase his book, though I'm badly backed up on my reading list, as it is.

I have a question and I might as well ask it here as well as anywhere else: In clearing a wild portion of my land that I have really never ventured into before, as I never really had the time, I found amongst pernicious aggressive shrubs we all know the names of, what looked, at first glance, like shrubs that I was sure must be natives. Unfortunately, even these plants were aliens, but certainly not usually found on the list of shrubs to eradicate immediately. These shrubs turned out to be silky dogwood, a handsome shrub that produces drupes the birds relish, but not leaves that the insects can eat in my area.

So my question is whether it would be a good idea to leave these dogwoods to occupy some of the exposed soil that would, I'm confident, have nasty seeds just waiting to sit in the sun for awhile before reinfecting the area with what I had just cleaned out? They appear to be well behaved and not aggressive, at least not like the Japanese rose and it's other companions that will surely take over an area if allowed to.

I need to have something growing on the soil back there, which, though it happened thrirty years ago, was a strip dug up to lay a septic line up to a sandy spot about a hundred or so yards behind other homes in my neighborhood, which still looks devoid of organic matter and ideal for those shrubs none of us want on our property...

Now, I don't plan on leaving these shrubs there forever, but only until I can find and plant trees and shrubs from Tallamy's list to make it most productive for wildlife. I'm asking, I guess, should I pull them out as I find them, or should I selectively leave the least harmful aliens to cover the soil while I'm finding and planting young trees and shrubs that will eventually replace these unaggressive aliens, with my help in the future??
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Old 07-04-2020, 12:21 PM   #7
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I enjoyed Larry Weiner's podcasts, and I will eventually purchase his book, though I'm badly backed up on my reading list, as it is.

I have a question and I might as well ask it here as well as anywhere else: In clearing a wild portion of my land that I have really never ventured into before, as I never really had the time, I found amongst pernicious aggressive shrubs we all know the names of, what looked, at first glance, like shrubs that I was sure must be natives. Unfortunately, even these plants were aliens, but certainly not usually found on the list of shrubs to eradicate immediately. These shrubs turned out to be silky dogwood, a handsome shrub that produces drupes the birds relish, but not leaves that the insects can eat in my area.

So my question is whether it would be a good idea to leave these dogwoods to occupy some of the exposed soil that would, I'm confident, have nasty seeds just waiting to sit in the sun for awhile before reinfecting the area with what I had just cleaned out? They appear to be well behaved and not aggressive, at least not like the Japanese rose and it's other companions that will surely take over an area if allowed to.

I need to have something growing on the soil back there, which, though it happened thrirty years ago, was a strip dug up to lay a septic line up to a sandy spot about a hundred or so yards behind other homes in my neighborhood, which still looks devoid of organic matter and ideal for those shrubs none of us want on our property...

Now, I don't plan on leaving these shrubs there forever, but only until I can find and plant trees and shrubs from Tallamy's list to make it most productive for wildlife. I'm asking, I guess, should I pull them out as I find them, or should I selectively leave the least harmful aliens to cover the soil while I'm finding and planting young trees and shrubs that will eventually replace these unaggressive aliens, with my help in the future??
Silky dogwood--at least what I think is silly dogwood is a native in my area...as far as I know. I am going to have to double check, as I have added it to our property.

That said, even if they are not native to your area, I do understand leaving them as you remove the worst of the worst. As you add other natives that fill in, if you find for sure that the silky dogwood is not native to your area, you can remove them at a later date.

That is my two cents. Hope it helps.
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Old 07-04-2020, 01:16 PM   #8
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Jack,

This is what I am seeing as the native range for silky dogwood:

https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=COAM2
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Old 07-04-2020, 03:25 PM   #9
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Jack Silky dogwood is native to the whole eastern US http://bonap.net/MapGallery/County/Cornus%20amomum.png I would definitely keep it, in fact I want to get one. Its still host plant to 117 moths and butterflies, it flowers off and on all year long where you'll have spent flowers/premature berries and new flowers at the same time, and it produces high fat berries for the birds migration. Its a great shrub. Specify Your Location - Native Plants Finder
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Old 07-04-2020, 05:00 PM   #10
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Jack Silky dogwood is native to the whole eastern US http://bonap.net/MapGallery/County/Cornus%20amomum.png I would definitely keep it, in fact I want to get one. Its still host plant to 117 moths and butterflies, it flowers off and on all year long where you'll have spent flowers/premature berries and new flowers at the same time, and it produces high fat berries for the birds migration. Its a great shrub. Specify Your Location - Native Plants Finder
I didn't realize it bloomed off and on like that...this year I am seeing new flowers blooming as others are faded, and a few have begun to swell into the premature green berries.

In past years, I have seen the rare few bloom late fall--I thought it was a fluke--unfortunately, the did not have time to develop into berries. I am going to keep a better watch on it this year to see if it blooms even more.
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