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Old 12-13-2015, 04:21 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Good to know.
...oh, and "heart root" is new to me,
The link is to a pdf so I have shown the relevant information. There are a few interesting pictures as well.

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/FCIN078.pdf/$FILE/FCIN078.pdf

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Büsgen et al. (1929) identified three principal types of root system shape that were attributed to species characteristics. However, as considerable variability is encountered even within a single species, only broad generalisations can be made about the shape of the root system.
• Taproot systems: where a strong main root descends vertically from the underside of the trunk. Examples include English oak, Scots pine and silver fir.

• Heart root systems: where both large and smaller roots descend diagonally from the trunk. Examples include birch, beech, larch, lime and Norway maple.

• Surface root systems: where large, horizontal, lateral roots extend just below the soil surface, from which small roots branch down vertically. Examples include ash, aspen, Norway spruce and white pine.

The systems outlined here are useful to describe rooting characteristics, however Dobson and Moffat (1993) warned against such rigid classification. The characters of the three forms are often not retained by a species and many exceptions occur (Bibelriether, 1966). Additionally, this classification gives no indication of the possible rooting depth. For example, a surface root system may have branching vertical roots which descend as deep or deeper than those of a heart root or taproot (Stout, 1956).
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Finally, it should be emphasized that for all tree species, the vast majority of roots will occur in the uppermost metre of soil.
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Old 12-13-2015, 07:03 PM   #12
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These pages are scanned from "The TreeKeepers Manual" pages 13-14. Our instructors were Dendrologists, Foresters and Arborists through Openlands , Morton Arboretum, USDA Forest service, Chicago Bureau Of Foresty, and the UIC.

So a direct link between improper pruning (which added to other stress which affect a tree, especially in urban settings), can cause root die back and less vigor in the trees growth.


Some tree biology to help explain...

Water and nutrients move from the soil into roots through the xylem (like a vascular system)through the roots, trunk, branches ,leaves. The leaves convert carbon dioxide and water into oxygen and food for the tree in the presence of sunlight (photosynthesis).

That food is then sent back through the Phloem (food supply line) to branches, trunk, and roots. The roots need this food to continue healthy growth.

Some roots are large and permanent, some are small and short lived. Roots also store extra food as starches during dormancy sending back to upper portions when active growth resumes.

A natural balance between the below ground and above ground parts of a tree must be maintained for a tree to remain healthy. When the root system fails to keep pace with the growth of the crown, decline or dieback may occur.
If massive and/or repeated loss of leaves happens in the canopy, much of the root system will die back.
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Tree advice for the wildlife gardener-scan0026-2-.jpg   Tree advice for the wildlife gardener-001-2-.jpg   Tree advice for the wildlife gardener-screenshot-869-.jpg   Tree advice for the wildlife gardener-screenshot-868-.jpg  
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Old 12-16-2015, 05:53 PM   #13
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What a wonderful success story EllenW! You must be so happy and proud.
Thank you linrose. I am really proud of all the landscaping I have provided for wildlife. Now that the leaves are off the trees I am seeing lots of bird nests
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Old 12-16-2015, 08:17 PM   #14
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I planted hundreds of trees when I moved here. Most were tiny seedlings. My neighbors teased me. Let me get out my magnifying glass. Now those seedlings are 30 feet tall.
How wonderful!

My neighbors (the few I have) probably never noticed the bareroot trees I added over the years...they do get lost in the expanse...I hope they wouldn't have teased me if they'd noticed.

I do recall putting one in near the property line and assuring her that it wouldn't get as huge as the other trees already there (since their driveway and house are close to the line). I mentioned its attributes and providing berries for the birds (not edible to humans. She teased me about planning to raid our blueberry patch...so, I ended up adding a blueberry bush on the property line so she wouldn't have to go far. . I plan to add more for them.
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Old 12-16-2015, 08:20 PM   #15
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Thank you linrose. I am really proud of all the landscaping I have provided for wildlife. Now that the leaves are off the trees I am seeing lots of bird nests
You should be proud...and what great evidence the nests are of the benefits you are providing.
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:24 PM   #16
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You should be proud...and what great evidence the nests are of the benefits you are providing.
Thanks dap. It makes me happy to provide for wildlife
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:33 PM   #17
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Thanks dap. It makes me happy to provide for wildlife
~smile~. I think we all have that in common here.
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Old 12-18-2015, 07:02 PM   #18
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I have to give the "survival award of the century", Dap, to that Japanese Maple that has survived your "killing" it for the past five or more years, ha ha!!!





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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Excellent article, Gloria!

Thank you for sharing.

I enjoyed reading all 12 points. I'm feeling even better about my approach to things in the yard.

As for (purposely) killing a tree in the yard, I have been trying to off the Japanese maple for a few years now. This past year, it did seem to be on its way out...we'll see. I tried girdling it, but it hung on for a long time. I'm thinking about doing that "volcano" pile of mulch thing at its trunk if it is still alive next year. I'm glad they included the part about snags. ~smile~

I loved the analogy of a tree and its roots resembling a wine glass on a plate instead of the mirror image we are familiar with. I do sort of question the fact that removing a limb "removes" a corresponding root...is that true? Does the root die because there isn't enough foliage to suppor it? I know when I used read up on bonsai (and a year or two of experimenting with them), I'd learned that when you remove 1/3 of the top growth, you should remove a third of the roots as well.

I'm all for encouraging the growth and health of my native trees, but I'd like to figure out the best way to kill off the Japanese maple and still leave it standing as a snag.
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Old 12-21-2015, 08:20 PM   #19
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I have to give the "survival award of the century", Dap, to that Japanese Maple that has survived your "killing" it for the past five or more years, ha ha!!!
~smile~ ...well, really more of a ~blush~.

I'll have you know...I took many pictures through this growing season to show you its demise...I just never got around to posting them. Now I'll have to dig them up and post them! (Maybe over Christmas break.)

Honestly, I'm still not sure it is dead, but the last I saw it, the few leaves remaining dried up in the drought we had in August. I was really hoping that the drought killed in off...but, at the same time some of a few of my natives did the same thing, but they had formed buds that grew the following year.

If it didn't kill it yet, I'll make sure this is its final year.

I can't help that I wasn't willing to cut it down, so I could keep it as a snag...if not for that, it would've been gone by now.

...and, if I recall, you are keeping yours for sentimental reasons.

Gee, I've missed your ribbing*.






*ribbing...a word I don't think I've ever used beforein my entire life.
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Old 12-22-2015, 09:21 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Excellent article, Gloria!

Thank you for sharing.

I enjoyed reading all 12 points. I'm feeling even better about my approach to things in the yard.

As for (purposely) killing a tree in the yard, I have been trying to off the Japanese maple for a few years now. This past year, it did seem to be on its way out...we'll see. I tried girdling it, but it hung on for a long time. I'm thinking about doing that "volcano" pile of mulch thing at its trunk if it is still alive next year. I'm glad they included the part about snags. ~smile~

I loved the analogy of a tree and its roots resembling a wine glass on a plate instead of the mirror image we are familiar with. I do sort of question the fact that removing a limb "removes" a corresponding root...is that true? Does the root die because there isn't enough foliage to suppor it? I know when I used read up on bonsai (and a year or two of experimenting with them), I'd learned that when you remove 1/3 of the top growth, you should remove a third of the roots as well.

I'm all for encouraging the growth and health of my native trees, but I'd like to figure out the best way to kill off the Japanese maple and still leave it standing as a snag.
I've had a similar experience with a Box Elder that is in a bad spot in my yard (waaaay too close to the neighbor's garage). I've cut/chopped/hacked at it year after year and it just keeps coming back. This spring, I put a 5-gallon bucket over the little stump and placed a brick on top of it. I think I finally WON!!! I haven't seen any sprouts at all this year.

Remember that mulberry I had topped in the spring? That bugger started to sprout BIG time after a few months. I asked my son to go out there with an ax and girdle it. We'll see how that worked out.

Good luck with that Japanese Maple...and I agree, you should get a "Survivors" award of some sort
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