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Old 08-09-2009, 01:37 PM   #1
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Default Daucus carota - Queen Anne's Lace

Daucus carota - Queen Anne's Lace

daucus_carota [Invasive Species]
Stewardship summary
Daucus carota is not usually a high-priority for management, but it can be persistent or require active management on heavy soils with a good clay content. Control is achieved by hand-pulling or mowing close to the ground before seed set. On lighter sandy soils it may persist for a few years on recovering prairies but tends to decline on its own as the native grasses and forbs become established.


Queen Anne's lace, wild carrot: Daucus carota (Apiales: Apiaceae)
Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Apiales: Apiaceae
Queen Anne’s lace is a biennial plant that is native to Europe and southwest Asia that grows to 3.3 ft. (1 m) in height. Leaves are pinnately divided and deeply dissected into narrow segments. The stem is coarsely hairy and, during flowering time, is topped with an umbel of small, white flowers. Sometimes there is a dark purple flower in the center of the umbel. Queen Anne’s lace can be found in sun to partial shade along roadsides, old fields and waste places.
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Old 08-09-2009, 01:38 PM   #2
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http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive...annes-lace.pdf

Ecological Impacts: Queen Ann’s lace invades open waste ground, competing for resources with native grasses and forbs. It can be a threat to recovering grasslands and prairies where it occurs because it matures faster and grows larger than many native species. It tends to appear after prescribed burning, however, it may decline as native grasses and herbaceous plants become established. Plant leaves cause skin irritation in some people and cause cows to produce off-tasting milk after eating large quantities.
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Old 08-09-2009, 02:48 PM   #3
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Queen Anne's lace is seriously underrated for it's invasive properties in my experience. I have been diligently trying to get rid of it on my property for over 7 years. Once it's gone to seed, the seeds remain in the soil for many years.

It's also not as easy to control as many would suggest. Cut all the flowers off, and it will send up another flower stalk. If it breaks off when you are pulling them, leaving any part of the root in the ground, it will continue to grow. Spraying is not very effective because of the fine foliage. Digging is unproductive because it brings a lot of the old seed to the surface.

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... but tends to decline on its own as the native grasses and forbs become established.
True, but if any kind of disturbance occurs it will be back with a vengeance.
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:36 PM   #4
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This is a major pain in my rear too.
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Old 08-10-2009, 09:57 AM   #5
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Daucus carota
Attached Thumbnails
Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-img_0817.jpg   Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-img_0819.jpg   Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-img_0816_00.jpg  
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Old 08-10-2009, 09:59 AM   #6
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Nice photos, Equilibrium. You made the Daucus carota look nicer than it ought. When is that goat going to get to work?
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:01 PM   #7
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I havent noticed that they are invasive here. They do grow along road sides and seem to be included in the "wildflower mix" the highway department uses. Queen Ann's lace and poppies - for miles and miles in the highway medians.
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:26 PM   #8
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TERRIBLE It took me 5 years of constant pulling and tugging to get them out. Problem is they can be 4' tall and even as short as only a few inches high and still flower spreading their seeds.
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Old 08-10-2009, 06:13 PM   #9
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I agree- it is very invasive. Not that I am playing Devil's advocate, but at least the plant has some beneficial faunal associations. The nectar of the flowers attracts many kinds of insects, especially flies and wasps, including parasitoid Gasteruption spp. (Wild Carrot Wasps). The foliage is eaten by the caterpillars of the butterfly Papilio polyxenes asterias (Black Swallowtail). With the exception of the Ring-Necked Pheasant, most birds don't use the seeds as a food source. Blue Jays have been known to use the foliage of Wild Carrot in the construction of their nests. This practice appears to be beneficial, as it reduces the number of nest lice and other parasites, producing healthier hatchlings with a higher survival rate. Apparently, the foliage of Wild Carrot contains an insecticide or insect repellant.

Again- I am a native plant person through and through. I am not defending the "wild carrot". But at least it helps sustain some natives in the process.

Just my two cents.
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Old 08-10-2009, 07:25 PM   #10
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RosaMultiflora

Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-p1350297.jpg

Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-p1350298.jpg

Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-p1350333.jpg

Daucus carota -  Queen Anne's Lace-p1350334.jpg
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From a Google search
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Queen Anne's Lace (Wild Carrot)
Daucus carota Queen Anne's lace was introduced from Europe as a medicinal plant. The vegetable carrot was bred from this plant.
Quote:
Women have used the seeds from Daucus carota commonly known as wild carrot or queen anne's lace, for centuries as a contraceptive,
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