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Old 07-24-2018, 09:32 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC Clark View Post
Sad to report that Lincoln has died. He was Da Man when it came to monarchs and unlike the other top monarch folks, he did not shy away from saying what he really thought of tropical milkweed. He will be greatly missed.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/lincoln-p-brower-scientist-and-protector-of-the-monarch-butterfly-dies-at-86/2018/07/21/aedcbdd8-8cf8-11e8-85ae-511bc1146b0b_story.html

https://monarchjointventure.org/news...rvation-leader
Sad.

At least he left a wonderful legacy.
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:49 AM   #62
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Another study is out showing tropical milkweed is bad news. Confirms that it screws up the migration. The part that is new is how the tropical milkweed sites in Texas contribute to the northward migration being exposed to OE. Swell. ;(

I have access to the actual study. This is part of the conclusion:

"In either case, these findings and other studies (Batalden & Oberhauser 2015; Satterfield et al.2015) collectively provide evidence that native,seasonal milkweeds rather than exotic, year-round milkweeds could best support monarch migration. We recommend that future efforts to restore pollinator habitat in eastern North America focus on native species and, when possible, avoid further planting of tropical milkweed. In locations where tropical milkweed is already present, it should be cut back monthly throughout fall and winter to limit monarch winter-breeding and its associated parasite transmission risk."

Good luck with that last part. Too many "monarch lovers" in TX have become enamored with their recent year round residents. They absolutely refuse to recognize that what they are doing is a problem.

This is a link to a review of the research article:

MONARCHSCIENCE.ORG
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Old 08-29-2018, 07:01 PM   #63
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Thank you, KC Clark.

Terrible news...but good to have evidence based support when bringing this up to people and stakeholders .
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asclepias, asclepias curassavica, blood flower, blood-flower, bloodflower, curassavica, mexican butterfly weed, milk weed, non-native, plants, scarlet milkweed, silkweed, tropical milkweed

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