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Old 03-07-2011, 02:14 PM   #1
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spider3 Identifying spiders

Identifying spiders-dscf1190.jpg
WEB, An interactive thread for identifying your spiders.
Identifying spiders-dscf5294-possibly-wolf.jpg
Behind in your spider I.D.s?
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Better go fly and retrieve them...

W.G.s Suunto states:
Quote:
"Field guides to spiders are not nearly as comprehensive as those for insects
Identifying spiders-dscf4540.jpg
Don't you think it's about time you retrieve those old photos gathering cobwebs
(Which by the way... are webs that have been abandoned) Kind of like your photos ha?...and enter them HERE for an I.D.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:23 PM   #2
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Identifying spiders-dscf7900-1.jpg

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There's life among the iris.
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:33 AM   #3
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The first and third individuals are orb weavers (family Araneidae) in the genus Araniella - see Six-spotted Orb Weaver - Araniella displicata photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example. The second one is a crab spider (family Thomisidae), but as it is an immature, I hesitate to put a more specific identification on it.
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:41 AM   #4
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How can you tell when a spider is immature? It's body mass?
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:58 AM   #5
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This little beauty intrigued me.
Identifying spiders-dscf8876.jpg
Its long almost transparent legs
Identifying spiders-dscf8877.jpg
set against a vivid green
Identifying spiders-dscf8879.jpg
of chartreuse.
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Old 03-09-2011, 04:32 PM   #6
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How can you tell when a spider is immature? It's body mass?
By it's punk attitude...

Actually, it's a little difficult to explain in just a a few words, but it hinges primarily on relative body part proportions as well as knowing what adults should look like.
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Old 03-09-2011, 04:38 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
This little beauty intrigued me.
Attachment 22931
Its long almost transparent legs
Attachment 22932
set against a vivid green
Attachment 22933
of chartreuse.
This is a long-jawed orb weaver (family Tetragnathidae) in the genus Tetragnatha - see http://i.pbase.com/o2/94/339594/1/11...H.IMG_6305.JPG for an example. These spiders frequently construct their web over or near small bodies of water and prey upon insects emerging from therein.
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Old 03-09-2011, 05:02 PM   #8
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By it's punk attitude...

Actually, it's a little difficult to explain in just a a few words, but it hinges primarily on relative body part proportions as well as knowing what adults should look like.
Oh You are so funny!
So I was..... partially right...Kinda sorta
You're not far off on that last one...He WAS along the river, on a wild rose!
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Old 03-10-2011, 08:12 AM   #9
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I noticed movement at my feet, saw a tunnel and posted by it to see if anything would creep out.
Identifying spiders-dscf0419.jpg
To my surprise a MEGA spider emerged.
I never knew we had spiders THAT huge in the area. (Hundred miles from my home)
I wonder how painful its bite would be....Look at the size of its fangs!
Identifying spiders-dscf0418.jpg
Notice the baby on its back.
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:44 PM   #10
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I noticed movement at my feet, saw a tunnel and posted by it to see if anything would creep out.
Attachment 22967
To my surprise a MEGA spider emerged.
I never knew we had spiders THAT huge in the area. (Hundred miles from my home)
I wonder how painful its bite would be....Look at the size of its fangs!
Attachment 22968
Notice the baby on its back.
This is a wolf spider (family Lycosidae) in the genus Geolycosa - see http://people.uleth.ca/~dan.johnson/...ensis_eyes.JPG for another example. This likely is the largest lycosid in your area.
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