Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening

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-   -   Attracting Bumblebees (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/insects-arachnids-gastropods/7722-attracting-bumblebees.html)

BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 12:40 PM

Attracting Bumblebees
 
Tips for attracting bumblebees.

Links from the web:

Coffee Can Cottages for Bumblebees

Plants of Interest for Bumblebees

Bring the Buzzzzz Back to Your Garden
by Pam Baggett
Fine Gardening: Expert garden plant advice, tips, and ideas from Fine Gardening magazine, including design, care, and how-to garden techniques.

Quote:

Is it the bumblebee’s lack of grandeur or its ubiquitous presence that makes gardeners neglect this tireless laborer? Whatever the reason, these fat, fuzzy buzzers deserve to be nurtured and cheered for their faithful work on the gardener’s behalf. And with the honeybee population being mysteriously decimated, other pollinators like bumblebees provide an underappreciated service we can no longer take for granted.
An interesting video about Bumblebees

BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 05:22 PM

Another interesting Bumblebee Article and Video

Attracting Bumblebees
P. Allen Smith
Gardenhome

Quote:

You probably want butterflies in your garden, even birds, but what about bumblebees Your initial response may be no but take a listen to Allen Smith's report and you might change your mind. Attracting Bumblebees
Quote:

Bumblebees have pollination down to a science because it's a matter of survival for them. You see they don't draw sweet nectar from flowers and make honey to feed on through the winter like the honeybee. Instead they gather pollen to store and eat. This process of gathering the pollen from bloom to bloom pollinates the very flowers that will become the produce we eat.

BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 05:44 PM

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Share your tips for attracting bumblebees.

Do you have plants or flowers that bumblebees like? Please share your photos!

Do you have ideas or links for enhancing bumblebee habitat? Please share them here.

Bumblebees in my gardens are quite plentiful. Here are some of their favorite plants, flowers, and blossoms.

Sunflowers
It seems that bumblebees are attracted to just about any variety of sunflower I plant. Sunflowers are late bloomers in my gardens, so when other blossoming plants are spent, the sunflowers offer late summer and fall pollen for the bumblebees.

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BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 05:51 PM

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More bumblebee and sunflower photos.

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BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 06:04 PM

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More plants to attract bumblebees....

Zinnias
Although not a native plant, their value is high in my gardens. They are constant bloomers throughout the summer and withstand early fall cool temperatures. Zinnias are an annual and come in many varieties and colors. Zinnia seed can easily be saved from spent blooms and replanted in the spring in cooler growing zones.
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Coneflowers

Coneflowers bloom around early to mid summer in my area (zone 4). They attract several types of pollinators, and bumblebees love them.
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Seedum

Seedum blossoms provide pollen for the bees in late summer and fall. It takes several frosty nights before the seedum blossoms go dormant for the winter. It's not uncommon for me to see a dozen or so bumblebees on a single seedum plant.
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BooBooBearBecky 11-27-2010 06:44 PM

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Happy Bumblebees enjoying Marigolds.
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Sleepy Bumblebee snoozing in a Pumpkin blossom.
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suunto 11-28-2010 06:56 AM

Bumblebees appear attracted to many flowers in our yard/garden; I tend to notice them the most in the nasturtium bed next to our make-shift 'patio.' Sometimes, if you are very careful and move slowly, you can get one to perch on a fingertip. I haven't been stung by one since as a child some 60 years ago, I accidentally trod on a nest. Honey bees on the other hand..

turttle 11-30-2010 10:59 AM

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I found them mostly on non-native caryopteris "blue knight", which buzzed with bombus impatiens and carpenter bees for six weeks or so until the flowers died back
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zinnias,
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Carpenter bees like marigolds
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and red salvia.
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havalotta 12-04-2010 01:58 AM

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Just a reminder...

dapjwy 12-04-2010 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BooBooBearBecky (Post 82906)
...


Quote: Is it the bumblebee’s lack of grandeur or its ubiquitous presence that makes gardeners neglect this tireless laborer? ...bumblebees provide an underappreciated service we can no longer take for granted.

Quote:

Originally Posted by suunto (Post 82978)
... Sometimes, if you are very careful and move slowly, you can get one to perch on a fingertip. I haven't been stung by one since as a child some 60 years ago, I accidentally trod on a nest. Honey bees on the other hand..

I've always liked bumblebees. As a kid I realized that they never seem to sting. It was not until I was a young teen that I was stung...and when it happened I didn't blame the bee...he got stuck under my t-shirt some how and stung me several times when it couldn't escape.

I still love them and have not been stung since!

As mentioned in the link, they really enjoyed my asters this year which bloomed well into October...maybe even early November.


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