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Old 06-20-2010, 09:29 AM   #21
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Annapolis, MD
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We've seen lots of fireflies this year, and they seem earlier than usual.

The only stuff we use on the lawn is corn meal gluten (and occasional chemicals painted onto bermudagrass clumps, etc.), and we have a good 'wall' of natives that serve as a foundation planting along three sides of the house.
The fourth side is still a work in progress--my son's dug out a couple non-native azalea, pieris, etc.

The interesting things we've noticed this year is that during the day they seem to really like to meet (and mate) on our Asclepias 'Hello Yellow'--last week it looked like a really out-of-control frat party--and they are flying really high, up as high as some of the trees, maybe 20-30 feet.

When I was a child, it seemed like they would fly much lower!
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:43 AM   #22
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Location: Northeastern MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teresa View Post
We've seen lots of fireflies this year, and they seem earlier than usual.

The only stuff we use on the lawn is corn meal gluten (and occasional chemicals painted onto bermudagrass clumps, etc.), and we have a good 'wall' of natives that serve as a foundation planting along three sides of the house.
The fourth side is still a work in progress--my son's dug out a couple non-native azalea, pieris, etc.

The interesting things we've noticed this year is that during the day they seem to really like to meet (and mate) on our Asclepias 'Hello Yellow'--last week it looked like a really out-of-control frat party--and they are flying really high, up as high as some of the trees, maybe 20-30 feet.

When I was a child, it seemed like they would fly much lower!
My understanding is those are the males flying up high. The females are "responding" to their signaling down close to ground level.

It seems as with much of the natural world that the research is less than complete on these wonders of nature. Their exact diet and life stages appear to remain a matter of speculation. I'd like to see a comprehensive report written for the educated lay person as opposed to for the specialist, which I'd only struggle to understand.
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Old 06-23-2010, 02:47 AM   #23
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Everything you wanted to know....'The Firefly Files', Firefly Facts and then stepping it up one notch, Firefly flashes and Nitric Oxide.
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Old 06-23-2010, 06:03 AM   #24
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Here's a site with some very interesting (and complex) information and a great illustration of the flash patterns of different species that shows how their signal patterns and flight paths would look with time-lapse photography.
Unfortunately it doesn't indicate which pattern belongs to which species, though it does give the source:
Firefly flashes and Nitric Oxide

And here's an article from Smithsonian magazine, that I found very entertaining:
Your Branch or Mine? | Science & Nature | Smithsonian Magazine

And I know there's an activity in one of my Envt. Education books called 'Talking With Fireflies. . .'
When I find it, I'll post more.
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Old 06-23-2010, 08:58 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teresa View Post
Here's a site with some very interesting (and complex) information and a great illustration of the flash patterns of different species that shows how their signal patterns and flight paths would look with time-lapse photography.
Unfortunately it doesn't indicate which pattern belongs to which species, though it does give the source:
Firefly flashes and Nitric Oxide

And here's an article from Smithsonian magazine, that I found very entertaining:
Your Branch or Mine? | Science & Nature | Smithsonian Magazine

And I know there's an activity in one of my Envt. Education books called 'Talking With Fireflies. . .'
When I find it, I'll post more.
Hmm, that Smithsonian article tells a male all he'll ever need to know about the other gender...
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Old 06-25-2010, 10:12 PM   #26
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I think I'm a little slap happy after the last few days but here goes since it's kinda cute. Sadly.... there really are kids out there that have never seen a firefly. This is from an e-mail....
When my grandson Ricky and I entered our vacation cabin, we kept
the lights off until we were inside to keep from attracting pesky
insects. Still, a few fireflies followed us in. Noticing them before
I did, Ricky whispered, "It's no use Grandpa. Now the mosquitoes
are coming after us with flashlights."
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