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Old 08-02-2017, 07:16 AM   #1
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Default Awesome Bee Poster

Here is a link to beautiful poster of native bees:

https://meadowrestoration.files.word...-poster-fb.jpg

(The link us much more clear than the screenshot of it that I provided.)

Awesome Bee Poster-screenshot_20170802-081343.jpg
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Old 08-02-2017, 08:39 AM   #2
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That is a nice poster. Over the course of a summer I see many of those bees. Honey bees all but disappeared around here for a few years but now are once again a common sight. Now there seems to be fewer bumble bees. Doesn't seem like the numbers are building like they should be by now. Hoping for a better August. Maybe the cool wet spring slowed food foraging.
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Old 08-03-2017, 12:06 AM   #3
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I have to study the poster more...see what I have around.

Cool that you see so many. I hope the bumbles rebound.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:05 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
That is a nice poster. Over the course of a summer I see many of those bees. Honey bees all but disappeared around here for a few years but now are once again a common sight. Now there seems to be fewer bumble bees. Doesn't seem like the numbers are building like they should be by now. Hoping for a better August. Maybe the cool wet spring slowed food foraging.
I read a study recently where researchers found that honey bees out compete bumble bees for resources (nectar and pollen) whenever those resources are limited. The honey bees did fine, but the bumble bees disappeared. The increase in honey bee population may be the reason that you are not seeing many bumble bees.
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Old 08-03-2017, 02:16 PM   #5
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To offer more choices to Bumblebees compared to Honey Bees is to take advantage of their long tongues. Culvers Root, Wild Bee Balm seem quite popular with them right now.
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Old 08-03-2017, 03:56 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
To offer more choices to Bumblebees compared to Honey Bees is to take advantage of their long tongues. Culvers Root, Wild Bee Balm seem quite popular with them right now.
Excellent idea! I will look further into that suggestion .
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Old 08-03-2017, 04:13 PM   #7
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This article talks about the length of bees tongues. Seems honey bees are on the short end of long tongue with bumble bee tongues being considerably longer.


https://honeybeesuite.com/the-long-a...y-bee-tongues/

Quote:
So there you have it: a honey bee is a long-tongued bee with a mediumish tongue. No wonder I couldn’t figure it out.
There may be other factors involved in the honey bee bumble bee foraging competition. It may be that the lower numbers of bumbles are encouraging the honey bees.

https://link.springer.com/article/10...265-015-1985-y

Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
October 2015, Volume 69, Issue****10, pp 1731–1738
Exploitative competition alters bee foraging and flower choice

Quote:
Abstract
In this field experiment, we test and support the hypothesis that exploitative competition between bees can influence several aspects of their foraging behaviour. Three treatments of lavender patches were set out: bumble bees excluded, honey bees excluded, control. Bumble bees are known to handle lavender flowers more rapidly than honey bees, partly due to their longer tongues. As predicted, excluding these superior competitors consistently (n = 4 trials) and greatly increased honey bee numbers per patch (14-fold increase; P < 0.001). The exclusion of bumble bee also caused multiple changes to honey bee foraging behaviour: time spent on a patch (+857****%; P < 0.001), flower handling time (+16****%, P = 0.040), interval between probed flowers (−27****%, P = 0.012), proportion of interflower flights (−26****%, P < 0.001) and flowers rejected (−12****%, P < 0.001). Conversely, and also as predicted, excluding honey bees had no effect on bumble bee numbers or foraging behaviour. A key consequence of bumble bee exclusion was to increase the mean flower nectar content from 0.007 to 0.019****μl (+171****%). By constructing an energy budget, we find that this leads to honey bees making a substantial, rather than a marginal, energetic profit per flower visited. Our results show the foraging behaviour of individual bees is extremely flexible and greatly influenced by the effects of interspecific competition on nectar rewards. Collectively, these individual decisions can have rapid and important consequences at the community level, including competitive exclusion.
I have some reading to do.
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Old 08-03-2017, 10:16 PM   #8
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Thank you, all, for the informative conversation.

Good info.

I have tons of pollinators visiting our Monarda fistulosa. ...including a good number of bumblebees.
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