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Old 01-08-2011, 09:25 PM   #51
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Landscaping with Native Plants
in Pennsylvania

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North America Rock Garden Society
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:29 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by will-o-wisp View Post
dapjwy, Where did you find the pearly everlasting?

Geum triflorum, prairie smoke, is real pretty in pink when it "smokes".
I did lose mine after 2 years but it was wonderful and very showy while it lasted.

I got it from friends in central PA...kind of far from where I'm living now, but I am trying not too be too rigid.

I have seen pictures of that Geum and agree it looks very attractive, however, I think it is native pretty far west of PA. I do have a rather inconspicuous white Geum, but it doesn't have a spectacular seedhead like G. triflorum.
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:30 PM   #53
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Oh Willo That's a real beauty!
I didn't know sweet fern was edible...

Hmmmm this part kind of scares me away from trying it..
I'm looking more for lotions, shampoo, perfume, candles and the like.
I *THINK* I read that the nutlets are edible. I'd heard nothing about the foliage.
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:34 PM   #54
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Dapjwy, I hope you're familiar with the plants I've suggested or at least able to locate photos of them on the net.
I slacked tonight. I normally like to include photos for identity but I've been catching up on the threads I missed while away.
I think I've made my way through the most of them so If you need any photos let me know.
I am familiar with most if not all of what you suggested. I'm hit or miss with botanical names...some I recognize, some I don't, but I tend to do image searches to make sure. (I had to look up the Polygala and Mitella, but after seeing the pictures, I think I recognize the plants...I just need to read up on them more. I know I was looking for one species of Polygala before, but using its common name at the time--which escapes me now.)
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:39 PM   #55
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On the USDA Plant Database you can do a state search for plants.

State Search | USDA PLANTS
State search
Put in the scientific name, click the state, then click "Display Results"

State Search Results | USDA PLANTS
These are the Geum for Pennsylvania.

If you want to find out if they are native to where you live, then:

Click on a name:
PLANTS Profile for Geum aleppicum (yellow avens) | USDA PLANTS
You'll see a US map.
Click on your state. Most of the time it will have the counties listed where it has been located:
Pennsylvania County Level Distribution for Geum aleppicum (yellow avens) | USDA PLANTS
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:29 AM   #56
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havalotta,I'm not very familiar with Mitella. I always thought Jack-in-the-pulpit required a moist area.

Perhaps I shouldn't have grouped these dissparate rocky areas into one thread, but I'm assuming you were talking about the sunny site when you suggested these.
I tried to suggest those that would work around the (Sunny) rock area you had spoke about...
Skip the Jack in the pulpit...It would require extra watering...You are correct on that one. My mistake.
Native Rock Garden Ideas?-dscf5363-mitella.jpg
The mitella
Isn't it cute.
Native Rock Garden Ideas?-dscf7558.jpg
And another short beauty!
Do you or anyone else recall its name?
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:34 AM   #57
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In this instance.....Wanting a Polygala sounds MUCH better than wanting it under its common name.... milk wort or snake root! YUCK
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Old 01-09-2011, 12:43 PM   #58
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In this instance.....Wanting a Polygala sounds MUCH better than wanting it under its common name.... milk wort or snake root! YUCK

I think I knew it as milkwort. Yes, some names sound much better than others.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought I'd read/heard that "wort" is Old English (?) for "plant".

Just thinking about the potential of my site has me VERY excited about the "finished" product. I think Polygala will be a great addition. I really want some open areas that don't need mowed but keep the area open for the bluebirds and other things that need an open habitat.


I'm looking up several individual species of Polygala that are native to my area. I'm surprised how different the flowers are on the different species...the one I was most familiar with (through pictures mostly) is possibly the least attractive of them all...and I still want it, like it. Polygala paucifolia is amazing looking--very orchid like flower. It may need more shade and woodsy soil than I have on that site, but I'm sure I have other places for it. Thanks for the suggestion...if not for that, I may not have looked into the different species.


Thanks to you, I made a list (for myself) of all of the Polygala spp. native to my area. I indicated those that I want most with !!! and added (for you) which I new as milkwort in parentheses.

Here is my list:


Polygala cruciata <— (most familiar)
P. curtissii <—!!!
P. incarnata <---
P. lutea <--- (most familiar)
P. nuttallii
P. paucifolia <---!!! (saw in picture only, didn’t realize it was same species)
P. polygama <---!!!
P. sanguinea <—! (most familiar)
P. senega <--- !
P. verticillata <---!!



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Old 01-10-2011, 08:53 AM   #59
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The P. paucifolia is the one that grows here in Michigan.
I never knew there were so many varieties and so so different from one another at that!...Thanks for including them.
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:58 PM   #60
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The P. paucifolia is the one that grows here in Michigan.
I never knew there were so many varieties and so so different from one another at that!...Thanks for including them.
No problem...thanks for the suggestion that sparked my research. I know the ones I was aware of were not nearly as attractive as P. paucifolia...but, I'd still like to include them.

BTW, as little as I know about botanical names, I noticed that I did know what some of them meant: mostly lutea, incarnata, and nuttalli (sp.) that surprised me! So, thank *you* for that.
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