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Old 01-22-2009, 05:47 PM   #1
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Default Pine Straw Direct (Pine mulch shipped from our forest direct to you)

Pine Straw Direct ships bales of pine straw directly to homes and businesses for mulching and landscaping at prices that are competitive with other premium mulches. Our website describes how organic and sustainably produced pine straw outperforms other mulches. Our site also makes ordering online easy and includes an online calculator to quickly determine the amount of pine straw needed.

We are members of the Mailorder Gardening Association and the Better Business Bureau.

Visit our website: http://www.PineStrawDirect.com
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:06 PM   #2
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I use pine straw mulch. It is a quality product and they will happily ship door to door.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:10 PM   #3
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This product looks a lot better than the crap they sell in garden centers.
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:05 AM   #4
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This product is now our feature product as an anchor for this forum. Thank you Pine Straw for sharing so freely with others. You must truly be an asset to your home community where you work and are raising your family.
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Old 10-21-2009, 10:38 AM   #5
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Default Pine Straw Direct (Pine mulch shipped from our forest direct to you)

Pine Straw Info (www.PineStrawInfo.com) has just launched an educational website designed to provide the best information available regarding pine straw mulch and where to buy it. The Pine Straw Info website was developed as a place for gardeners, landscapers, homeowners, nurseries, garden centers, property managers, environmental managers, contractors, commercial builders, home builders, and others to find detailed information about using and purchasing pine straw mulch.

Mulch has been proven to be invaluable in all gardens and landscapes as it adds necessary organic matter, helps prevent loss of topsoil from wind and water erosion, reduces water usage by maintaining soil moisture, reduces rainwater runoff, reduces soil compaction, lessens soil temperature fluctuations, improves soil tilth, makes the landscape more attractive, reduces maintenance, reduces weed growth, insulates soil to keep plants cooler in summer and warmer in winter, improves soil aeration, structure, and drainage over time, improves soil fertility, inhibits certain plant diseases, and reduces damage from trimmers and lawn mowers.

The Pine Straw Info website describes how pine straw (or pine needles), well known for its natural mulching properties and environmentally sustainable production, outperforms other mulches. It does this by explaining and showing how pine straw is simple to apply, lasts a long time, is lightweight and very easy to handle, reduces weeds, reduces water evaporation which in turn saves water, is cost competitive with other mulches, improves soil and plant health by adding organic material and nutrients to the soil, and doesn't attract termites. "Pine straw just breathes better and doesn't compact like some other mulches, which contributes to better plant health. Secondly, rain easily infiltrates pine straw and evenly and softly disperses the water amongst your plants, without floating out of the flower beds. Since it doesn't float, it is also one of the best mulches for all types of erosion control" the website's developer Scott Jacobs stated. Jacobs' site also contains articles, photos, videos, and testimonials regarding pine straw, where it can be purchased in every state, and an online calculator to determine the amount of pine straw needed for any garden, landscape, or environmental project.

Jacobs, who has an extensive background in gardening, landscaping, and environmental and forest management, believes that pine straw is by far the best, easiest, and most cost effective solution for healthy gardens and landscapes. "Why bear the cost, hassle, and tiring work of carrying heavy bags of mulch or shoveling through a pile all day and pushing heavy wheelbarrows of mulch to your site. Pine straw bales are easy to carry and handle, are competitively priced with other premium mulches, outperform other mulches, and are simple to spread and store. Pine straw can be easily shipped or delivered to you depending on your location, and best of all, it is an organic product that is sustainably produced" Jacobs said.

Pine Straw Info's new website can be found at Pine Straw Info - everything you want to know about pine straw (pinestraw and pine needle) mulch
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Old 10-21-2009, 10:46 AM   #6
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Pine Straw Direct ships bales of pine straw directly to homes and businesses for mulching and landscaping at prices that are competitive with other premium mulches. Our website describes how organic and sustainably produced pine straw outperforms other mulches. Our site also makes ordering online easy and includes an online calculator to quickly determine the amount of pine straw needed.

We are members of the Mailorder Gardening Association and the Better Business Bureau.

Visit our website: http://www.PineStrawDirect.com
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Old 04-10-2010, 11:13 PM   #7
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I've used pine straw before. I had, last year, a lot more than I was used to, and used it on a specific section. I was impressed enough with the results to pick up a bale ($7.25) at the garden store.

I have a couple of questions about your product, PinesStraw, if you don't mind. It's not cheap, for a cheapskate like me. I would only use it in specific situations (i.e. you'll only sell me a bale or two a year, at most).

I noticed germination of seeds was terrible (like, non-existent) in areas mulched with pinestraw. But this year, in the same areas sown last, I have a great volunteer population of the leafy stuff (in this area, chard and parsley) that I know are seeds from last year germinating. The straw I used was 2 seasons old, not composted, and the acidification thing is not really about germination. Also, the straw was parted like any mulch around seedholes. Why didn't they germinate? I'm not frustrated, it was $1 in seeds at the most and I had them elsewhere anyway, I was just impressed; at first I thought I'd gotten some mold on that specific bit of seeds, or had some weird even occur in the whole area, but I'm not sure?

2nd, I see that you suggest 15 bags of mulch/bale of straw. Can you give me a better sense of the volume that is? I buy a bale at the local center, it's (admittedly) much smaller than the one pictured, but how does it compare, volume-wise, to a yard? Talk to me in landscaping terms, please; what do I need to mulch a bed 30x30? Or 12x4?

Also, I have to ask: what's in the dye you offer? This is a pointed question. Is it safe?

I'm intrigued by the product. I segregate all the "needles" in my compost/bough flow now (cedar, hemlock, etc.) just for mulching purposes. I just don't understand a lot about it, or what you're offering, as it pertains to what I can do with it and what to expect of it.

Thanks.
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Old 04-12-2010, 10:19 AM   #8
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The way we look at the cost is in comparison to store bought mulch. You can have this delivered to your door for about the same price as the equivalent coverage of bagged mulch, which incidently, you have to usually go pick up and load and unload. This is assuming you don't have a free supply from your own home or a neighbor. It is much easier to handle and spread straw than bags of mulch, or bulk mulch that has to be shoveled and transported. If you haven't seen the pine straw spreading video on the frequently asked questions page of our site, you should watch it.

As far as germination, I understand that pine straw releases a chemical that prevents germination (which makes it excellent for weed control). I can't find my reference material on that at the moment, and I don't remember all the details. That chemical would be gone over a year's time, which would explain why you got germination the following year or two. There could be another explanation, so not knowing all the details of your garden plots, that would be my best guess. Pine straw will not have any adverse affect on sprouted plants, but I always recommend waiting to mulch until everything has sprouted and is at least a few weeks old and/or well established.

As far as coverage comparison, our bales will cover about 120 square feet at 2.3-3 inches deep, which is about what you should lay initially. You can layer it much deeper and I have lots of beds that are about 6 inches deep. That is about the maximum or you will smother plants. So a 30x30 bed would be 900 square feet. You would divide that by 120 and get about 7.5 bales required. There is a link on our site for a bale calculator that will calculate the amount of bales required if you input the dimensions of the bed or area you wish to cover.

The mulch dye uses iron oxide and carbon black and lots of water.

I hoped I answered all your questions. If not, please don't hesitate to send a followup message. Please take advantage of the bale calculator, spreading video and additional information we have on our website.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CincyGarden View Post
I've used pine straw before. I had, last year, a lot more than I was used to, and used it on a specific section. I was impressed enough with the results to pick up a bale ($7.25) at the garden store.

I have a couple of questions about your product, PinesStraw, if you don't mind. It's not cheap, for a cheapskate like me. I would only use it in specific situations (i.e. you'll only sell me a bale or two a year, at most).

I noticed germination of seeds was terrible (like, non-existent) in areas mulched with pinestraw. But this year, in the same areas sown last, I have a great volunteer population of the leafy stuff (in this area, chard and parsley) that I know are seeds from last year germinating. The straw I used was 2 seasons old, not composted, and the acidification thing is not really about germination. Also, the straw was parted like any mulch around seedholes. Why didn't they germinate? I'm not frustrated, it was $1 in seeds at the most and I had them elsewhere anyway, I was just impressed; at first I thought I'd gotten some mold on that specific bit of seeds, or had some weird even occur in the whole area, but I'm not sure?

2nd, I see that you suggest 15 bags of mulch/bale of straw. Can you give me a better sense of the volume that is? I buy a bale at the local center, it's (admittedly) much smaller than the one pictured, but how does it compare, volume-wise, to a yard? Talk to me in landscaping terms, please; what do I need to mulch a bed 30x30? Or 12x4?

Also, I have to ask: what's in the dye you offer? This is a pointed question. Is it safe?

I'm intrigued by the product. I segregate all the "needles" in my compost/bough flow now (cedar, hemlock, etc.) just for mulching purposes. I just don't understand a lot about it, or what you're offering, as it pertains to what I can do with it and what to expect of it.

Thanks.
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Old 04-13-2010, 07:37 PM   #9
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You answered all of my questions, except the germination bit. I'd come across this somewhere, and forgot, and was amazed to see it actually happen so dramatically. I did realize, though, that the straw had no negative effect on already germinated seed.

Thanks again.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:49 AM   #10
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I went back and found some of the research regarding the germination topic. It appears the pinenes in the straw are what impact seed germination, but those flash off fairly quickly. They do leave some residual by-products in the soil, but I believe those are fairly short lived as well. Common belief is that pinenes vaporize fairly quickly. If the straw you used was two years old, you wouldn't think there would be anything left in it. Through some of my testing (http://www.pinestrawinfo.com/PineStr...calTesting.pdf) I found that some of the organic compounds can be retained if the straw if not directly exposed to the weather and will leach downward and concentrate in lower levels if piled. For my eduation and curiosity, was the two year old straw kept out of the weather or left to lay outside (exposed to rain and/or sun)? Was it piled, or laid naturally and then raked up before use?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CincyGarden View Post
You answered all of my questions, except the germination bit. I'd come across this somewhere, and forgot, and was amazed to see it actually happen so dramatically. I did realize, though, that the straw had no negative effect on already germinated seed.

Thanks again.
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