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Old 01-21-2009, 11:20 AM   #1
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Default Chinkapin, castanea pumila

Greetings!

I am in the planning stages for a new garden bed in my yard. Details on the project are over in the playground thread. I plan to include a few fruit and nut trees or shrubs in this planting, and I was wondering if anyone could give me information on the trees and shrubs I am considering.

One of the shrubs/small trees I am considering is chinkapin, castanea pumila. I’m thinking in a few years my son will get a kick out of playing with the spiky seed-pods, as well as eating the nuts. Is anyone here familiar with this plant?

I heard somewhere that this bush is susceptible to the chestnut blight, but that if it contracts the blight, it is likely to survive.

What is the minimum distance that I should plant this from my house, in order to keep branches and roots from becoming a problem? (The house is two-story and has a gutter.) Are there any reasons that this wouldn’t be a good choice for inclusion in a children’s play area? Will I need to protect the young tree from our resident hungry deer population?

[size=3]Can anyone confirm if http://www.empirechestnut.com/catalog.htm
]this
is a reputable nursery for purchasing chinkapin? Or can you recommend somewhere else?


Have I heard correctly that I will need two of these in order to get a crop of nuts?

Thanks for your feedback!
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Old 01-22-2009, 12:27 AM   #2
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"I heard somewhere that this bush is susceptible to the chestnut blight, but that if it contracts the blight, it is likely to survive." I don't believe so although there are many still standing. That's a cousin to the American Chestunt, Catanea dentata. I wouldn't trust it to survive.

"What is the minimum distance that I should plant this from my house, in order to keep branches and roots from becoming a problem?" The roots shouldn't be a problem. Spread will depend on which Chestnut you pick.

"Are there any reasons that this wouldn’t be a good choice for inclusion in a children’s play area?" No

"Will I need to protect the young tree from our resident hungry deer population?" Yes

"Have I heard correctly that I will need two of these in order to get a crop of nuts?" Yes

Consider this CHestnut, http://www.oikostreecrops.com/store/...a=any&PT_ID=73
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:22 AM   #3
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Thank you Equil!
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:09 PM   #4
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You might also want to protect them from your bunny population as well. Rabbits will "gird" the bark off young trees with no problem. I usually wrap mine and use a wire cage around the young trees until they get some growth. Keeps off both rabbits and deer.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:49 AM   #5
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Thanks Sapphire!
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:00 AM   #6
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The biggest chinkapins (Castanea pumila) I've seen are ten or fifteen feet tall at the most, so I don't think there'd be a problem planting one maybe ten feet or so from a house (?)

At least some chinkapins have male and female flowers on the same tree - I never noticed myself, but there a pics on Duke's site of catkins with m/f flowers.

http://www.duke.edu/~cwcook/trees/capu.html

male/staminate catkins and leaves
Attached Thumbnails
Chinkapin, castanea pumila-dsc03966.jpg   Chinkapin, castanea pumila-dsc03969.jpg  

Last edited by swamp thing; 01-24-2009 at 01:23 AM. Reason: added pictures
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:07 AM   #7
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"The biggest chinkapins (Castanea pumila) I've seen are ten or fifteen feet tall at the most, so I don't think there'd be a problem planting one maybe ten feet or so from a house (?)" I would agree.

Good photos.
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:05 PM   #8
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Thank you Swamp Thing!
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