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Old 02-21-2010, 01:19 PM  
amelanchier
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Default Invasive Earthworms in Northern Hardwoods Forests

There are no native terrestrial earthworms in most of the northern U.S. and Canada. During the glaciation of the last Ice Age, any earthworms that might have lived in this region died.[1] Thus, the earthworms that we see...

Last edited by BooBooBearBecky; 03-26-2011 at 10:35 PM.
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  #10  
By amelanchier on 02-26-2010, 05:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgerowe View Post
Really interesting article, amelanchier. You note that earthworms are not native to glaciated areas, but are they native to some non-glaciated areas? I am in an un-glaciated area (from the last Ice Age, anyway). What does that mean about the earthworms that I uncover?
Yes! There are some native earthworms in the southern U.S., although there are also non-natives. I recommend doing research on this before getting rid of any earthworms where you are.
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  #11  
By Hedgerowe on 02-26-2010, 07:58 PM
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Okay; thanks! I've got my homework for tonight.
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  #12  
By Chomp on 03-18-2010, 05:25 PM
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That's a cool article, and it looks like there's quite a lot of information behind it. I wrote something like that in 8th grade, and posted it on the website a while back.
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  #13  
By Dirty Knees on 03-18-2010, 05:30 PM
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I read your article Chomp. I didn't know earthworms weren't native before reading it. Tks to both you and amelanchier for waking me up.

DK
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  #14  
By Verm on 03-26-2011, 01:09 PM
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"There are no native terrestrial earthworms in most of the northern U.S. and Canada. During the glaciation of the last Ice Age, any earthworms that might have lived in this region died."

this has me wondering.

i've found worms in sandy soil above the 60th parallel in previously glaciated areas. the remote location, population base and lack of agriculture suggests to me that perhaps this fairly broad statement: 'any earthworms that might have lived in this region died' might be a bit misleading.

i don't mean to take away from the problem of invasive species. i just wanted to emphasize that northern Canada is a very large 'region' with many unique and relatively unstudied ecosystems.

*fwiw - the worms were found quite deep, almost a foot iirc, and under an area of bunch grass. i always assumed they were nightcrawlers but now i wish i took pictures.

**i'm still wondering about this the ice-free corridor between the two ice sheets from northern Canada into Montana might account for earthworms found near the corridor
Last edited by Verm; 03-26-2011 at 03:03 PM.. Reason: clarification
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  #15  
By maricybele on 03-26-2011, 01:53 PM
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Could be the deer. I saw a program about the variety multicolor trees declining in New England due to deer not having enough predators anymore and eating the seedlings. Could be a link. It showed that acreage blocked off from the deer grew the multicolor tree seedlings where as areas without fencing had none.
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  #16  
By biigblueyes on 03-26-2011, 03:39 PM
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I feel sorry for your poor northerners without earthworms. I grew up knowing that earthworms are a gardener's best friend. Now, after hanging out with y'all, I know that the right earthworms are a gardener's best friend. Didn't know there were bad ones before.
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  #17  
By dapjwy on 03-26-2011, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Verm View Post
i just wanted to emphasize that northern Canada is a very large 'region' with many unique and relatively unstudied ecosystems...

**i'm still wondering about this the ice-free corridor between the two ice sheets from northern Canada into Montana might account for earthworms found near the corridor
The fact that it is such a vast area and that there was an ice-free corridor makes it seem entirely possible that those worms belong there...however, while reading your post, I also wondered if there were a chance they could've been brought in by fishermen and some were dumped or escaped. Just a thought.
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  #18  
By KC Clark on 02-28-2013, 04:02 AM
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I was very surprised when a fellow lepidopterist told me a few years ago about how worms were messing with northern hardwood forests. She sent me the first article that amelanchier linked, which taught me the word "duff."


A few years ago, Ohio State researchers figured out that European night crawlers were responsible for planting ragweed seeds in the US.

Blame Your Allergies on the Earthworm
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earthworms, forests, hardwood forests, hardwoods, invasive, invasive species, invasive worms, northern, northern hardwood forests, worms

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