Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Reduce That Ecological Footprint > Education For

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-26-2011, 09:08 PM   #11
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
I agree, and if someone has seen a hummer use a plant and they do not know weather it was a native or not, please don't let that stop you from posting. That way everyone may learn.....
Right, post anything that you've seen them utilize...if you know it is not native, please note it...if you don't know, someone may reply that it is not a native plant--this is not an attack, just clarification. Deal?

__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2011, 09:26 PM   #12
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Deal......
I don't mind if anyone mentions things not being native. It's a good way of informing others. As you may already know, I carry quite a bit of that ornamental guilt you may have heard us talk about.
Actually when I joined the sight I had no idea there were so many NATIVE inclined people involved. With a name "Wildlife gardeners" I just figured it was anything to do with attracting wildlife and any sort of gardening. Little did I know.
What I do know is.....I enjoy both the sharing and the learning from one another, so post away.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 01:11 AM   #13
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

I've found Coral Honeysuckle, Lonicera sempervirens, to be the best plant at getting hummingbirds. The flower shape and color are ideal. Really any honeysuckle will work provided the flowers are not split half way open. It blooms early with a tremendous pop of flowers all over the plant, and continues sporadically over the summer and autumn.

Japanese Honeysuckle starts blooming about a month later and is an awful choice for hummingbirds. Does great at attracting large carpenter bees which also love drilling into wooden decks and fences! The problem is the flowers split open half way down the tube, allowing more bees to have access to the nectar.

Trumpet Vine, Campsis radicans, is another one I've seen Hummingbirds visit but I don't think it gets as much attention as Coral Honeysuckle. The flowers are long enough but they're almost to big at the same time. They bloom over the summer though while Coral Honeysuckle is not at it's peak. Unlike Coral Honeysuckle though this plant can turn into a monster if not pruned properly and it's sap has irritating qualities when applied to your skin.

If you have an abundance of Irises it can get their attention. Bee Balm aka, Bergamot or Monarda, are also designed for hummingbirds, but bumblebees and occasionally honeybees go for these too.

Touch Me Not, aka Jewel Weed, is a great summer source of nectar. Impatiens capensis. I don't know where the genus name comes from for this plant as it's certainly anything but impatient. It's a prolific annual, who's seeds take two years to germinate. So you will need to plant this in the same place for 3 years in order to get a consistent patch of them growing. I've seen this growing sporadically along wide stretches of road sides near streams and it's very eye catching.

Indian Pink, Spigelia marilandica, is one to look into as well. I've seen them in person and they seemed to have a lot more flowers to them than what internet pictures lead you to believe.
Attached Thumbnails
Plants that attract Humming birds-coralhoneysuckleanthers.jpg  
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 06:54 AM   #14
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

I was not familiar with the Indian Pinks you mentioned.
After a quick search I located a photo....I'ts now a must have and has been added to my wishlist.
Another search ran me into the "TOP 10 NATIVE" humming bird plants. We are already well on our way.....
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 08:01 AM   #15
WG Fundraising Coordinator
 
linrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kentucky
Default

I mentioned recently that I've seen the hummingbirds go to Penstemon digitalis, maybe because it is an early bloomer when not many other plants are blooming and they have that trumpet shape hummingbirds like. I've also seen them go to phlox, I have some marsh phlox and some tall phlox near a hummingbird feeder and they visit them also. They enjoy lilies too, I have the native Michigan lily as well as some non-native orienpets, 'Black Beauty' and 'Red Hot' and the oriental 'Stargazer'. (I'm a fool for fragrant plants, lilies and roses are my favorites!)

Of the non-native plants I've seen them go to, the salvias are popular, they really like Salvia 'Black and Blue' which I'm trying to eradicate from one of my gardens, it is a thug and took over a lot of real estate. I will leave a few just for the hummers though! It is an attractive plant even though it is aggressive. Any of the salvias that are native in the southwest and Mexico are popular because they are food sources in their winter homes.

As far as native vs. non-native plants for wildlife, that subject has been discussed at length already in other threads but suffice it to say I will probably always have a few non-natives in my gardens, especially since I have 1/2 acre of yard and 4 1/2 acres of land we manage to eliminate invasives. I have sentimental attachments to certain plants that I'll always have (lilies and roses!) while doing my best to plant new natives in the gardens by the house such as my prairie bed and some native shrub borders.
linrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 08:09 AM   #16
WG Fundraising Coordinator
 
linrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kentucky
Default

Oh, I forgot Monarda. I have Monarda didyma and Monarda fistulosa. Both are native and the hummingbirds love it.
linrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 08:22 AM   #17
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Aesculus pavia - knowing that I'm pushing it beyond its southern borders, I have two of these and they are the greatest attraction on my land for hummingbirds in early spring. Interestingly, because of the cold, raw, and rainy weather up to a few days ago, these trees have not yet flowered this year. When they do, I get to even watch hummingbirds perching on nearby trees between visits to their panicled flowers.

Who knows? Perhaps global warming will push these species back here anyway. I'm curious whether they were residents here before the last ice age when so many species were pushed to the Smokey Mountain region where the glaciers finally ended their southern movement. It's said the great plant diversity in the Smokies resulted from northern plants being moved southward in the last Ice Age.
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 10:28 AM   #18
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrILoveTheAnts View Post
Touch Me Not, aka Jewel Weed, is a great summer source of nectar. Impatiens capensis. I don't know where the genus name comes from for this plant as it's certainly anything but impatient. It's a prolific annual, who's seeds take two years to germinate. So you will need to plant this in the same place for 3 years in order to get a consistent patch of them growing. I've seen this growing sporadically along wide stretches of road sides near streams and it's very eye catching.
I introduced the Impatiens capensis, Jewel Weed to a spot close by within site last summer by digging a couple of plants from way up in a wild section of my land. This year I can't believe how many seedlings are coming up in the new location. They've not flowered yet this year, but I have heard they are hummingbird candy. I'm looking forward to the action they will bring.
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 10:51 AM   #19
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

It scatters freely ALL over.
I've often wondered if it is sown through bird scat as the clusters that germinate are so profuse!
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 08:16 PM   #20
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Actually when I joined the sight I had no idea there were so many NATIVE inclined people involved. With a name "Wildlife gardeners" I just figured it was anything to do with attracting wildlife and any sort of gardening. Little did I know.
Funny, my interest has been focused on re-establishing native plants...when I joined here, it didn't occur to me that the focus might not be on natives. As time went on, I realized that I am a wildlife gardener as well--not only do I love the native trees, shrubs, and forbs...I also enjoy the native critters that benefit from them and visit them. That has always been the case, but I've always state that I'm interested in native plants. Perhaps I should begin to describe myself to others (outside of this forum) as being interested in native plants and the native critters they support.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
attract, attraction, birds, flame acanthus, flowers, hummers, humming, hummingbird, monarda, monarda didyma, plants, rose pavonia, skeleton plant, turk's cap, wildflowers

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2