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Old 03-09-2009, 02:41 PM   #11
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Heeheehee. You're baaaddddd. And that can be good!
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Old 03-10-2009, 03:57 AM   #12
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You guys are being naughty, LOL
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Old 03-10-2009, 09:30 AM   #13
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We have fireflies in our yard every summer, too. They seem to like to perch in the bed of everbearing raspberries. Since we don't use herbicides or pesticides in our yard, or on the lawn, I suppose the environment is friendly to fireflies. For whatever reason, I don't see them in our neighbors yard, and his lawn is always very green and totally weed-free.
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Old 03-10-2009, 12:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erictjohnson View Post
We have fireflies in our yard every summer, too. They seem to like to perch in the bed of everbearing raspberries. Since we don't use herbicides or pesticides in our yard, or on the lawn, I suppose the environment is friendly to fireflies. For whatever reason, I don't see them in our neighbors yard, and his lawn is always very green and totally weed-free.
erictjohnson-
I find that really interesting that two backyards right next to each other offer such different environments. No harsh pesticides in your yard vs. your neighbor's yard, which mostly likely contains pesticides. Kind makes ya wonder what other beneficial insects have packed their little suitcases and moved on to a better place (your yard).

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Old 03-10-2009, 07:13 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Stoloniferous View Post
Last year the Boton Museum of Science ran a data-gathering website to gather information on fireflies. The results can be seen here:

https://www.mos.org/fireflywatch/view_and_explore_data

I assume they will be running it again this summer. Participation is simple: register your yard, and then enter data on the presence of fireflies (or lack thereof) when you feel like it.

This is a particularly good project to involve children in.
Wow! That's great! I'll be signing up, I have many fireflies on my property (in season, of course).

I think this is one of the underutilized features of the internet (data gathering). I'm presently registered with the Cornell University Ornothological Society to report bird nestings on my property. Info can be found here.

Thanks for the teriffic post!

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Old 03-23-2009, 09:32 AM   #16
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You're welcome!
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Old 03-23-2009, 10:06 AM   #17
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Watching for the fireflies to appear each year is a summer ritual. It isn't summer until the fireflies begin to light up at dusk.
They can not breed in the tight roots of a turf lawn but do well in the soil of flower beds in gardens where no chemicals are used.
Did you know that firefly larvae are major predators of slugs. They will work together to immobilize prey then feed.
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Old 03-23-2009, 02:48 PM   #18
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Did you know that firefly larvae are major predators of slugs. They will work together to immobilize prey then feed.
Gloria, thanks for sharing that, it's something I didn't know. But I'm always interested in anything that will encourage beneficial insects to come to the party and stay here. Much easier to keep the pests under control that way.
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Old 03-23-2009, 09:39 PM   #19
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I didn't know they ate slugs. Fireflies are elevated to an even higher status in my book.

Your Worminess- they eat cutworms
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