Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Butterflies & Moths

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-05-2009, 08:33 AM   #21
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

I'm a tree lover too. The worst kind. One with a typical small urban yard.
I find trees and shrubs more interesting than flowers.
I have these and they're also host plants
Malus - Crabapple .. 311
Acer - Maple .. 285
Crataegus - Hawthorn .. 159
Rosa - Rose .. 139

Juniperus virginiana Red cedar
Cercis canadensis (Eastern redbud)
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 08:43 AM   #22
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Me too. We must be two peas in a pod. I haven't found any other tree lovers here besides you. You could always volunteer for the FPD and get your tree fix if you're running out of space at home. I spread out to my neighbor's properties. When I have had extras for propagating I offer them to my neighbors. They've been planting them.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 08:47 AM   #23
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

Butterfly Plants In The National Garden
The majority of these plants are native to the eastern half
of the United States. More information is available at
www.usbg.gov.
Butterfly Larvae Host Plants
Trees
Asimina triloba (pawpaw)
Betula nigra (river birch)
Carpinus caroliniana (American hornbeam)
Cercis canadensis (Eastern redbud)
Cornus florida (dogwood)
Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar)
Ptelea trifoliata (common hop-tree)
Sassafras albidum (sassafras)
Quercus spp. (oak trees)

Shrubs
Lindera benzoin (spicebush)
Rhus spp. (sumac)
Viburnum spp.
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 08:52 AM   #24
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

What's FPD?
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 08:53 AM   #25
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Forest Preserve District. Which ones from the above are you going to add to your yard? All of them??? Way cool if you're going for all of them.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 09:16 AM   #26
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

Honestly I don't have room for any more, trees grow.
I already have:
5 red cedars
3 red maples
3 redbuds
2 Washington hawthorns
1 honey locust
1 American crabapple

Not to mention ...
5 potentillas
5 Little Henry sweetspire
4 winterberry hollies
3 Carolina roses
3 redtwig dogwoods
1 yellowtwig dogwood
2 midget arborvitae

And a raspberry bed and vegetable gardens.

I planted everything but the honey locust and the 1 red maple that volunteered. Thats a lot of trees for a lot that's 120ft x 54ft.

Ok so I'm bragging.
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 09:42 AM   #27
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

You have good reason to brag. It takes a lot of planning AND a lot of planting to pull that off.

Did you sing your list to the tune of Partrige in a Pear Tree?
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 10:13 AM   #28
Pope
 
Hedgerowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia
Default

Equilibrium, I AM a fellow tree lover and am awfully fond of shrubs as well. In the last two years I have planted 3 Nyssa sylvatica, 3 Tulipifera liriodendron, 1 Cercis canadensis (would like more), 2 Crataegus spp(?), 5 Pinus taeda, plus approx 120 shrubs including (getting lightheaded--must lapse into common names now) serviceberry, gray dogwood, silky dogwood, various viburnums, ninebark, red chokeberry, fringetree, inkberry, winterberry, southern bayberry, wild rose (virginiana), eastern hazelnut, and spicebush. There are a couple of others but I'm drawing a blank as to names.

I've only recently gotten around to putting in any sort of flower bed, and it's not much to look at yet. So far my heart is with the trees and shrubs; they are my babies. There are plenty of oaks, wild cherry, pines, hollies, and cedars in the area already, and I was delighted to discover a pecan tree on the property (although I guess it's not a native here; I love it so it is staying).

What I would like to plant would be at least another hawthorn, a shagbark hickory or two, perhaps another related nut tree like heartnut, butternut, or pignut, and I'd like to see if I could grow a longleaf pine here. From what I've read, I may be a bit too far north but with the USDA zones creeping further north as they have been, who knows?
Hedgerowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 11:28 AM   #29
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

This is great! How did I miss the rest of this conversation?
Tree lover here but also a big prairie grass and forb nut. It is so hard to split my small urban lot into a woodland edge and a grassland...
I don't know if I could live in a house without big old awesome trees. Old trees have great odd shapes and interesting cavities and dead branches, with cool shade in the hot days in summer. The garden is several degrees cooler than the street always.
Nothing is more relaxing than lying face up looking through the trees at the sky, or whatever bird is making so much noise up there.

There are two mature box elders that the grandchildren climb, an aging maple, a spreading to close to the house red cedar,a young but taller than the house honey locust(that just bloomed recently and smelled wonderful), very young recently planted hawthorn and redbuds.
The shrub list is longer and we keep adding more.
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2009, 11:46 AM   #30
Pope
 
Hedgerowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia
Default

Gloria, I couldn't agree with you more about old trees, how they are shaped, the variety of habitats each can support in those cavities and dead limbs and among the leaves. Sigh.

And milkweed, I neglected to mention how impressed I am by the amount and varieties of trees and shrubs you have planted. You should and must brag! I am blown away by your hard work, and am a bit embarrassed for having bragged about my efforts. Maybe some day I will approach your herculean deeds (if my back will hold out that long)!
Hedgerowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
butterflies, butterfly garden, host, host plant, native plants, nectar, plants, pollen, shrubs, trees

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2