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Old 06-27-2013, 03:59 PM   #1
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Default Box elder leaf roller moth

Growing through the hydrangea was a box elder seedling, or second year maybe sapling. Just as I was going to remove it I noticed the leaf tips were roled up and sealed. Peeked of course, it looks like a tiny little green caterpillar, probably box elder leaf roller. Then I saw a bug scurry away...predator? I don't know and the picture is blurred, but thought to share.
The seedling is safe for now as I watch and take pictures but the creatures are on notice, soon to be evicted...lol.
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Old 06-28-2013, 03:37 PM   #2
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Aren't those little discoveries the best!!! I can see the blotch that's probably the bug you were talking about scurrying away but I have no clue what it is.
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Old 07-03-2013, 03:50 PM   #3
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It is nice of you to spare the seedling while it is supporting (hosting?) the larva. If you have a place for it elsewhere, perhaps you could move it later in the year.
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Old 07-03-2013, 11:02 PM   #4
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I find the gardens endlessly amusing. From year to year so much is the same but so much is always different.
No room for any more trees and if there where I'm afraid box elder would not be on the list. But there are many box elder in this old neighborhood even after the new sidewalks took out many.
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Old 07-04-2013, 07:56 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
I find the gardens endlessly amusing. From year to year so much is the same but so much is always different.
No room for any more trees and if there where I'm afraid box elder would not be on the list. But there are many box elder in this old neighborhood even after the new sidewalks took out many.
Since I'm still trying to fill an area to become woodland, I can scarcely imagine having no room for more--but, I'm sure I'll get there someday.

I know it is not necessarily a tree-in-demand, but what do you have against them (if anything)?
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:38 AM   #6
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Nothing against box elder. The old neighborhood trees were all pretty much box elder,silver maple, black locust, sycamore,and pear trees.Newer trees include too many honey locust and what looks like an ornamental pear.A bit of diversity is in order. Old box elder are full of cool insects and holes for wildlife. Wild bee colonies were very common here before so many old trees were taken down. My daughter had one right outside their front door for years. Most people never even noticed the hives if they were high enough in the trees.
I want a swamp white oak for our low spot in the neighborhood. They are one of the recommended street trees to withstand low oxygen in the soil and street salt tolerance. I live in a very urban area.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:00 PM   #7
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You had me at
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Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
A bit of diversity is in order.
~smile~

Yes, I agree with you about more biodiversity...and oaks are a welcome choice to add to the mix (as are tons of other trees, as well, but oaks do support a lot of insect life and therefore birds as well).

Cool about the beehives.
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