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Old 06-13-2009, 11:20 AM   #1
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Default Green Planet: How Plants Keep the Earth Alive (Rice)

This is a newer publication. Has anyone read it-
Amazon.com: Green Planet: How Plants Keep the Earth Alive: Stanley A., Ph.d. Rice: Books

There is only one review for the book.
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Last edited by Calliandra; 07-30-2010 at 01:48 PM.
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Old 06-15-2009, 08:34 AM   #2
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The review is not useful. And a little redundant - the same information is repeated over and over again. The editor must be asleep!

There was a list:

This book on native plants was at the top of the list.

http://www.amazon.com/Botanica-North-America-Illustrated-History/dp/0062702319/ref=cm_lmf_tit_1_rdsssl0
QUOTED:



Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly
With over 420 entries and more than 670 pages, this encyclopedia by Canadian gardening writer Harris (In the Garden, Favorite Garden Tips, etc.) provides a comprehensive celebration of the trees and flowers native to North America. (Harris defines "native" as "a plant that can be documented to have been in North America prior to European contact.") Her book emphasizes the historical and medicinal aspects of its entries. For example, under "Flowering Dogwood," Harris notes that Native Americans used the tree as "an indicator plant" whose blooms let them know when it was time to plant corn and that dogwood's bark contains the same malaria-treating ingredient as quinine. This volume is a good choice for those who are interested in ecologically conscious gardening and botanical history.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/?docId=1000027801
Harris is currently editor of Gardening Life. Botanica North America, which took five years to write, is certainly her major work.
In separate chapters North America is divided into 10 plant communities: "The Eastern Forests," "Swamps and Wetlands," "Florida," "The Boreal Forest," "The Prairie," "The Desert," "California," "Montane," "The Tall Trees," and "The Tundra." A map illustrates the areas crossing state and provincial boundaries. The Florida plant community is the southern half of the state, and "Tall Trees" includes part of northern California. Prairie runs from Texas to the southern part of Alberta.
Throughout the text Harris stresses plant ecology and the importance of preserving the natural world. The 420 plants included are native--documented to have been in North America before exploration by Europeans (1450) and still in existence. Plants that are considered the most important historically, ecologically, or economically are first in each chapter, followed by other plants arranged in botanical families. Each entry includes botanical, ethnobotanical, geographical, and historical information. We learn that sphagnum moss was used by Native Americans to line diapers, and in World War I it was encased in muslin and used for surgical dressings. Dogwood berries are high in fat, and robins depend on them for energy in migrating from the south. Quotations, poems, and excerpts from books and articles are scattered through the text and well documented. The photographs are all in full color, and many are full-page or double-page spreads. Unfortunately, the index includes only plant names. The two-volume Botanical Garden (Firefly, 2002) might be considered similar, but it is more of an identification source. Botanica North America concentrates less on identification and more on how North American trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals have survived and flourished. It is a necessary acquisition for public and academic libraries with a strong botanical collection. Gardeners will love to have their own copies to read in the dead of winter or on a warm summer evening. RBB
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/image...V42752349_.gif http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0062702319/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books


Product Details
  • Hardcover: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Collins; 1st edition (November 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062702319
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062702319
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Old 06-15-2009, 10:15 AM   #3
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I did not find the review helpful either which is why I asked.

NSTA Recommends :: Green Planet: How Plants Keep the Earth Alive
Quote:
Reviewed by Sarah Haines
Science Education Professor

This book summarizes for high school or college audiences the role plants play in Earth's ecosystems. The text covers basic concepts in an accurate and interesting manner. This is appropriate as a reference, source of selected readings, or general review.

Each chapter describes a different role: adding oxygen to the atmosphere, keeping Earth from overheating, providing shade, participating in the water cycle, creating soil, and creating habitats, to name a few. The information in each chapter is supported by scientific evidence from various fields. The author includes notes and a bibliography for those seeking more information about the research presented.

As I read the book, there were countless times when I thought to myself: "my students need to read this" or "I should mention this to my students when we cover ______." I will definitely use the book in general biology as well as in a science methods class for preservice teachers. It would be perfect for supplementing a lecture or lesson plan notes, or for students to read as a supplement to a textbook in any general biology or environmental science class.

Review posted on 6/5/2009
Rutgers University Press Blog: Natural Science
We can afford environmental protection

Quote:
By Stanley A. Rice
Author of Green Planet: How Plants Keep the Earth Alive

They say we cannot afford environmental protection. Not now, during the economic downturn.

But as I explain in the recently-released Green Planet: How Plants Keep the Earth Alive, we cannot afford to lose the benefits that the natural world—especially plants—provides to us. Economist Robert Costanza estimated that natural ecosystems provide $33 trillion (that’s right, trillion) of free services to the world economy. In my book, I explain what many of those services are. Natural ecosystems such as forests and grasslands put oxygen in the air, remove carbon dioxide from the air, create cool shade, prevent floods and droughts, produce food, create soil, create habitats and heal them from disturbances. The cost of doing all of these things for ourselves without the help of plants is not quite incalculable, but pretty close to it.
Forests and grasslands are more valuable to us just as they are than they would ever be if converted into commercial products or real estate. The trees and grasses are even more valuable to us than the wild animals that we love so much. For, it must be admitted, deer and bears are pretty much like us—they eat food, breathe in oxygen, and breathe out carbon dioxide. But plants are the counterpoint of renewal to our animal activities: they make food from sunlight, produce oxygen, and absorb carbon dioxide. They run on solar energy and reproduce themselves. They do everything in complete silence and unutterable beauty. We do not need to pay them or even to thank them, just give them a chance to live. They are not doing this for us, but as their own way of making a living. But by pursuing their own lives, they create life for us.
Plants cannot save the world all by themselves. We are producing too much carbon dioxide for them to absorb even under the best conditions. And the conditions are not best: warmer and drier conditions will make it harder for plants to grow. At the same time that we need them the most we are destroying them. As I argue in the closing chapter of my book, we need to live frugally, creating as small of a carbon footprint as possible—perhaps one small enough that plants can, in fact, erase it. A greenhouse disaster is now inevitable, because the carbon dioxide that is in the air already has yet to absorb all of the heat of which it is capable. But perhaps there is still time to minimize the disaster.
Read more essays by Stanley Rice at his website: http://www.stanleyrice.com.
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Old 06-18-2009, 05:03 PM   #4
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I'm reading it now. _Green Planet_ covers a lot of ground but still holds my attention. I'll post a review after I finish the book, but it may be awhile since I've decided it's worth double-digging (rereading and highlighting sections).
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Old 06-18-2009, 05:15 PM   #5
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Oh my, it's worth double-digging? The sounds encouraging.
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Old 06-20-2009, 01:38 AM   #6
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It's worth double-digging. But I set the book down somewhere, and now I can't find it, darn it.
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