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Old 08-04-2012, 11:43 AM   #41
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Default Succsess can be achieved

Two little cuties
Managing English House Sparrows around Bluebirds-p1030517.jpg
I've removed 7 nests, 2 clutches of eggs and 1 female HOSP from this box this season and finally the bluebirds won
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:38 PM   #42
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FANTASTIC!!!

Creating "HOSP free" zones works!

I just got back from a week of fishing. I have three young bluebirds in a box that are about a week younger than those. I just checked them and they seemed fine. The adults were concerned with me checking because I've been gone. All three were healthy, but I lifted the nest and there were dozens of blowfly larvae. I don't think that the young would have survived if I had not removed most of them. I'll get more tomorrow. They can take some parasite load, but I have lost entire broods to blowfly.

In the mid-Michigan area blowfly start in late June/early July. I just lift the entire nest during the day. Blowfly larvae hang there and feed at night. I sweep the little buggers out with the fingers on my other hand. They would make good panfish bait.

Keep up the great work!
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:20 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishlkmich View Post
FANTASTIC!!!

Creating "HOSP free" zones works!

I just got back from a week of fishing. I have three young bluebirds in a box that are about a week younger than those. I just checked them and they seemed fine. The adults were concerned with me checking because I've been gone. All three were healthy, but I lifted the nest and there were dozens of blowfly larvae. I don't think that the young would have survived if I had not removed most of them. I'll get more tomorrow. They can take some parasite load, but I have lost entire broods to blowfly.

Wow, I have not heard of blowfly infestation of bluebirds down here, now I shall have to ask about it occuring with Texas birds . Have not encountered it with the broods on my place. Good information!
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:21 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by recurve View Post
Two little cuties
Attachment 31289
I've removed 7 nests, 2 clutches of eggs and 1 female HOSP from this box this season and finally the bluebirds won
Congrats! It is wonderful that you have made progress against such a formidable foe!
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Old 09-23-2012, 04:00 PM   #45
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Default Foot Canker on HOSP?

Well, I haven't had time to look at the website much---been trapping HOSP every chance I have, which is a weekend day here and there. They usually come over to my place in bigger numbers this time of year, and I am catching as many as I can before the chipping sparrows and whitethroats, etc. arrive. So far I have caught at least 60, mostly females, mostly juveniles---an accomplishment because these rural birds are canny and require more strategy to catch. A female I just caught had this foot canker looking stuff on both her feet (and starting to go up one leg). This is a condition I have not seen before. A fungus? Benign tumors? Any ideas?
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Managing English House Sparrows around Bluebirds-hosp-feet1.jpg   Managing English House Sparrows around Bluebirds-hosp-foot2.jpg   Managing English House Sparrows around Bluebirds-hosp-foot-2.jpg  
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Old 09-24-2012, 12:36 PM   #46
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Default Foot Pox?

My research on the internet has brought up a possible culprit---Foot Pox. Viral, possibly spread by mosquitos, can be highly infectious. This affected bird was still in good physical condition. I will see if I can contact the Texas Ornithological Society for a positive ID.
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Old 09-25-2012, 03:54 PM   #47
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Lemme know what you find out.... I've never seen that before and I hope I don't but... now that I've seen your photos.... I wanna know!!! Really great photos.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:42 AM   #48
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It sure looks like pox. Wonder if we will see more of it due to the warm winter/summer. No-see-ms (sp?) are spreading a disease trough our southern Michigan whitetail herds and killing thousands.
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:31 PM   #49
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Default Avian Pox

Haven't had time to confirm that this is indeed Avian Pox, but it is a pretty sure bet. I am attempting to send an info link, not too experienced with that sort of thing....

USGS National Wildlife Health Center - Avian Pox

Hope it works!
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:32 PM   #50
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And another one for Equil!

Avian Pox - How To Treat Your Chickens For Avian Pox - BackYard Chickens Community

(Though she might have seen it already!)

Last edited by scarecrowsdrm; 09-27-2012 at 08:34 PM. Reason: Additional info
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