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Old 12-15-2014, 09:21 AM   #91
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Other than cardinals, what eats the safflower seeds?
Finches and doves. The best - spring and summer rose breasted grosbeak, here.
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Old 12-15-2014, 09:40 AM   #92
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I get finches, doves, cardinals, native sparrows chickadees, titmice, nuthatches, etc. Most birds eat safflower seed. Starlings don't eat it either. It takes a while for the birds to start eating it. It is more expensive but you don't get flocks of HOSP's and starlings so it lasts longer. Grey striped sunflower seed is harder for them to eat because the shells are thicker.
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Old 12-16-2014, 07:49 PM   #93
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Finches and doves. The best - spring and summer rose breasted grosbeak, here.
Thanks, fishlkmich's. Maybe i should switch over...I'm guessing the house sparrows don't eat it?
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Old 12-16-2014, 07:54 PM   #94
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I get finches, doves, cardinals, native sparrows chickadees, titmice, nuthatches, etc. Most birds eat safflower seed. Starlings don't eat it either. It takes a while for the birds to start eating it. It is more expensive but you don't get flocks of HOSP's and starlings so it lasts longer. Grey striped sunflower seed is harder for them to eat because the shells are thicker.
Thanks, Ellen. That sounds like quite a list.

I'm thinking of mixing the two until they get used to the safflower. The only thing is, I've not really been watching enough to notice if the house sparrows stayed, or if they just stopped once and didn't return. Hopefully, during Christmas break, I'll be able to watch them more and assess the situation better.
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Old 12-17-2014, 08:05 AM   #95
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Thanks, fishlkmich's. Maybe i should switch over...I'm guessing the house sparrows don't eat it?
Most birds really don't like it. I have one large hopper feeder that I put out just for cardinals. Then I noticed the few others that use it. It's big enough for doves to sit on it. The stuff is expensive, but it lasts forever. If you have a bunch of finches and run out of other food, they will clean out the safflower. I hear that squirrels won't eat it and I never saw one do so.
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:29 AM   #96
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Safflower isn't a prefered feed but many birds eat it. It lasts a long time so I think the cost is about the same. This is the first winter in 15 years that I have been here that I don't have HOSP's. They stop here but don't stay. I am so happy. I put out grey striped sunflower seeds also. Many birds like it but the HOSP's have trouble eating it because the shell is thicker than black oil sunflower seed.
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Old 12-17-2014, 07:47 PM   #97
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Most birds really don't like it. I have one large hopper feeder that I put out just for cardinals. Then I noticed the few others that use it. It's big enough for doves to sit on it. The stuff is expensive, but it lasts forever. If you have a bunch of finches and run out of other food, they will clean out the safflower. I hear that squirrels won't eat it and I never saw one do so.
Hmmm...I'll look into it over my break. Not sure what to do yet.

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Safflower isn't a prefered feed but many birds eat it. It lasts a long time so I think the cost is about the same. This is the first winter in 15 years that I have been here that I don't have HOSP's. They stop here but don't stay. I am so happy. I put out grey striped sunflower seeds also. Many birds like it but the HOSP's have trouble eating it because the shell is thicker than black oil sunflower seed.
I have to wonder that those I saw didn't just pass on through...it seems that is what happened the couple of times I've seen them in past winters.

I guess I went with black oil because more birds can open the thin seed costs; maybe the striped ones are a better way to go.
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Old 12-18-2014, 11:04 AM   #98
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Dap you could stick with the black oil sunflower seed unless the HOSP's start staying around.
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:32 PM   #99
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Dap you could stick with the black oil sunflower seed unless the HOSP's start staying around.
True. I was just surprised to see them one day...and there were about a half dozen or so...I'm not around to watch them often--or feed them regularly, but soon I'll be off from work with a chance to see what is coming around regularly.
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Old 12-19-2014, 09:11 AM   #100
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Enjoy your time off dap. Let us know if those HOSP's come back.
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