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Old 08-16-2011, 07:06 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Good to know! Thanks for sharing.

Do you think they come for other birch species as well?

I've read that they adore (or at least eat) sycamore seeds--I have one mature sycamore and am going to move some of the seedlings I've found into my woodland. I've yet to notice them eating the seeds, but I'll try to check it out this year.
Do you mean the Sycamore maple? It is actually listed on the forbidden plant list in Massachusetts.

Here's the list:

MDAR - Division of Crop and Pest Services - Prohibited Plants List
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:27 PM   #12
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Do you mean the Sycamore maple? It is actually listed on the forbidden plant list in Massachusetts.

Here's the list:

MDAR - Division of Crop and Pest Services - Prohibited Plants List

I've never heard of a sycamore maple. I'm talking about our native sycamore (Platanus occidentalis). (I had to look that up...I don't have many Latin names memorized.)
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:41 PM   #13
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I've never heard of a sycamore maple. I'm talking about our native sycamore (Platanus occidentalis). (I had to look that up...I don't have many Latin names memorized.)
I used to live on the ocean about ten miles north of Boston, and we had there an abundance of Sycamore trees. The problem was, and I didn't know it at the time, was that they were all alien invasive species that do very well on the seashore and can withstand salt spray and wind quite well.

I'm glad to say that even then I didn't like them, there never seemed to be any animal action around them. Since then, it has become illegal to sell the species in the state.

This is the monster I am speaking of:

The World´s Tree Species: Sycamore Maple - Acer pseudoplatanus
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:47 PM   #14
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I had to look it up, then when I got back here, I see you included a link.

I got to thinking that you may recognize sycamore by a different common name, so I did a search and came up with these: American planetree, buttonwood, American sycamore, and buttonball-tree.
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Old 08-17-2011, 10:20 AM   #15
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Prairie dropseed gets about a foot or so high, flower stalks two to two and a half feet or so. Mine are only a couple years old, they take a while to establish. This part of the prairie bed is under construction, the grasses are there but I need to add more forbs among them so it looks pretty messy now. Indiangrass is in the back with its broad leaves, little bluestem is sprawling onto everything around it, sideoats grama and prairie dropseed are in the front. Sideoats gets about the same height as dropseed but you can see that the leaves are coarser, dropseed has very narrow leaves and a sort of hummock like shape when mature with a fine texture.

Sideoats on the left, dropseed on the right for comparison with little blue flopped in between them and indiangrass in the back.
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Goldfinch in late summer-grasses.jpg   Goldfinch in late summer-dropseed-sideoats.jpg   Goldfinch in late summer-prairie-dropseed.jpg  
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Old 08-17-2011, 07:01 PM   #16
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Prairie dropseed gets about a foot or so high, flower stalks two to two and a half feet or so... dropseed has very narrow leaves and a sort of hummock like shape when mature with a fine texture.
Thank you for not only the description but some pictures as well!

This was the year I was supposed to focus on my grasses...I'd planned to get a lot of plugs of little bluestem. Perhaps in the fall sale, if we get out to that nursery over the NY border.

I'd like to include sideoats grama and prairie dropseed--I wonder if I can find a local source. There are so many grasses, sedges, and rushes that I need to add to our property, they sometimes take second stage to the forbs and trees...but they really shouldn't.

I am starting to appreciate the taller grasses too...at least where I saw them in a (restored?) meadow:
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Goldfinch in late summer-1523.jpg   Goldfinch in late summer-1517.jpg   Goldfinch in late summer-1509.jpg   Goldfinch in late summer-1532-cropped.jpg  
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:13 PM   #17
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My volunteer sunflower bloomed, and it's really attracting the bees and butterflies! Maybe later when the seeds form the goldfinches will enjoy it too. Such a happy looking flower! I'll have to plant some on purpose next year.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:37 PM   #18
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I just had to post this picture of indiangrass for you dap just to entice you into growing the taller grasses. Backlit in the morning it's really stunning.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:42 PM   #19
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It is a happy looking flower...or at least a flower that brings happiness.

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Originally Posted by linrose View Post
I'll have to plant some on purpose next year.
Yes, I think I will try to grow more next year as well.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:44 PM   #20
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I just had to post this picture of indiangrass for you dap just to entice you into growing the taller grasses. Backlit in the morning it's really stunning.
I've come to realize, in the right setting, I would like some tall grasses.

I *love* backlit grasses...especially little bluestem in winter! Thanks for sharing.
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