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Old 03-23-2009, 04:34 PM   #51
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Have you ever seen 150 of them? I haven't. At most a handful.
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Old 04-05-2009, 06:06 PM   #52
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Talking Indigo buntings and a prothonotary warbler!!

Indigo buntings, cedar waxwings, and a prothonotary warbler!!!

The indigo buntings are back! They pass thru this time of year in little flocks on their way north and to local nesting areas. I know they won't stay at my feeder - they do nest locally, but prefer wooded edges of big fields full of grass seeds. (They nested at my prior home in the country; an old cow pasture with grown-up fencelines.) They're eating white proso millet and the seeds of the panic grass I let grow up in the yard.

But the crowning delight of the day was a prothonotary warbler who came in for a bath at the pond. Soaked, he flitted into the huge gardenia bush beside the pond and spent several minutes preening. He was gorgeous - looked like sunshine with slate gray wings. While he was there, a cedar waxwing came down for a drink. They seemed to be attracted by the splashing fountain.

Made my day.
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Old 04-06-2009, 07:37 AM   #53
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Quote:
I always thought worms in the garden were a good thing, but just last year, found out that they are non-native invasives in MN deturbing hardwood forest undergrowth (duff).... who knew ?!?
We meaning me has an issue with y'all bad mouthing ALL worm species with this little deal. Part of this depends on what the species eats. I doubt seriously gourmet composting worms are gonna wanna eat at the McDonalds in the forest.
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Old 04-06-2009, 07:58 AM   #54
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I'm upset that they're picking on my wormy friends too. Everything has a place, and just like worms might not be helpful in the forest, I don't want them in my pantry either. But in the garden, they're my best friends.

Now let me go talk nice to my worms since y'all hurt their feelings. . . .
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:00 AM   #55
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Now let me go talk nice to my worms since y'all hurt their feelings
Me too, these plp don't realize how sensitive my little worm friends are, poor babies.
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:17 AM   #56
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I got to visit with mine yesterday. Was turning some ground to pop in transplants, and I'd saw a lot of them. If they fell far from their own dirt, I'd scoot them back in place and let them hide from me.

Go, babies. Eat up!
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:03 AM   #57
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I noticed the first chipping sparrows of the season, at my feeder yesterday.
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Old 04-07-2009, 12:01 PM   #58
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A couple of nights ago a very interesting visitor showed up - a large black bear! My feeder is close to the window, so we had a very good view. If I would have opened the window I could have reached out and touched him with a yardstick. The outdoor yard light kept him very well lit while he alternately dined and checked on my two barking spaniels.

He wasn't after the feeder per se. I keep my sunflower seed in a metal garbage can next to the feeder, and this is what he pushed over to start his dining pleasure. There was only a gallon or two of seed left, since I usually stop feeding when the ground is no longer snow covered. Nevertheless, he spent about 30 minutes enjoying himself.

He would lay on his belly and stick his paws and head into the container for a minute or two. Then he would sit up much like a dog sits and check to see what was happening around him. He kept this up until the food was gone. Then he just wandered off into the dark.

Black bears are not uncommon in my area, but it's a rare treat to watch one this close. The experience was at various times exciting, a bit scary, and even comical.
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Old 04-07-2009, 04:40 PM   #59
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Lots of black bears would go straight for the garbage can!

I guess I'm glad the largest thing at my feeders are squirrels.
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Old 04-07-2009, 07:40 PM   #60
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The next day I checked our compost pile and I was quite surprised that he hadn't visited it. We throw our kitchen waste (banana peels, vegetable scraps, etc.) on there; things that I thought would be good bear treats. Perhaps he was just in a sunflower seed mood.
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bird, bird feeder, bird feeders, bird species, birdfeeders, birds, blue jays, cardinals, cedar waxwings, chickadees, doves, feeding birds, feeding the birds, finches, indigo buntings, mourning doves, northern flickers, nuthatches, prothonotary warbler, purple finches, redpolls, titmice, turkey, warbler, woodpecker

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