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Old 04-25-2010, 08:34 AM   #21
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The fringe-tree and the native azalea 'Marydel' do bloom just about the same time.

This morning the first three or four blooms opened on Marydel and there are plenty of the white things--well, whatever you call them!--hanging down on the Chionanthus, but not quite open yet.

The other plant I have that the hummingbirds love is my non-native Agastache 'Ava' (looking furtively to see who might be watching!), but it doesn't bloom until later on--like the lobelia, monarda, etc.

I have a couple struggling heuchera, but they aren't quite ready to bloom yet, and my native columbine are still quite a way off, too.

And my Lonicera sempervirens is blooming nicely, but no sight of hummingbirds yet.

Pictures later. . .
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Old 04-25-2010, 09:23 AM   #22
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Will-o-wisp, like early bees early hummingbirds use flowering trees and shrubs like red buckeye and azalea. I don't think red buckeye is native to your area but there are azalea to check out.
Good point! That reminds me of a later blooming tree that I believe is used by hummingbirds: tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)

Now that I'm more awake, I can add a few more that come to mind. I've seen them going to Penstemon digitalis (which is white, hummers do go to flowers other than red), Iris versicolor, Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata), and, I swear if memory serves, at wild geraniums (Geranium maculatum).
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Old 04-25-2010, 09:30 AM   #23
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Jewelweed

Video clip of hummer at jewelweed showing the dip of the flower on springlike pedicel.

http://www3.amherst.edu/~ejtemeles/impatiens.html

Gloria, that is so cool. Jewelweed--Touch-me-not has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid. Thanks for sharing an interesting fact. Unfortunately, the video didn't play for m.
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:40 PM   #24
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Default Lonicera sempervirens 'Crimson Cascade'

Here is a picture of my Lonicera sempervirens 'Crimson Cascade' taken 25 APR 2010 in zone 7.
This particular plant is almost three years old and has put out tremendous growth even in the last few days since this was taken.

(The saying is 'The first year they sleep, the second year they creep, the third year they leap.')
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:46 PM   #25
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Default Rhododendron atlanticum 'Marydel'

And here's a couple shots of Rhododendron atlanticum 'Marydel' taken at the same time. In the background you see a Fothergilla and a bronze fennel (it's not native, but the nectar is enjoyed by butterflies and by late summer all the foliage has been eaten up by the swallowtail caterpillars).

I'll take another photograph or two of 'Marydel' since she's opening more blooms every day.
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Old 04-30-2010, 12:41 AM   #26
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The Lonicera looks FANTASTIC on the fence. I dunno why so many people load fences up with morning glories when they could have the look you have. Somebody just asked me what a good substitue for their pink Rose of Sharon was. I himmed and hawed and drew a blank. Can I grab your rhodo photo to send to my friend? I think she'll like it and it'll be one less Hibiscus syriacus out there if she does.
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Old 05-04-2010, 07:32 PM   #27
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The amount of blooms on our coral honeysuckle have tripped in number since the picture down below was taken. Also the dirtiness in the colors, normally seen on growth over the winter and early spring, has washed out and we're seeing the flowers at their full intensity. The dirtiness can still be seen in the photo on the unopened flowers.
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Old 05-04-2010, 11:31 PM   #28
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What dirtiness? I only see deeper coloration adding some spice to the plant. I like the variation in color. That's a nice looking plant.
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Old 05-04-2010, 11:46 PM   #29
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What dirtiness? I only see deeper coloration adding some spice to the plant. I like the variation in color. That's a nice looking plant.
All the parts that developed over the colder parts of spring had a deep purple tinge to them. It's not much but it's noticeable. You can really notice it on the new buds to the picture I've attached here. See but all the flower buds coming out now Don't have this darkness to them. They're producing almost as bright as the final flower when it opens.
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Old 05-05-2010, 01:55 PM   #30
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You're welcome to show my native azalea 'Marydel' pictures.
Here are two shots with more blooms open. . .
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attract, attract birds, attract hummingbirds, bowman's root, cardinal flowers, gillenia trifoliata, hummingbirds, lobelia cardinalis, lonicera sempervirens, native honeysuckles, native plants, native plants for birds, native plants for hummingbirds, nectar, plants

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