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Old 04-15-2010, 08:16 PM   #11
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My Lonicera sempervirens (Crimson Cascade) begins to bloom just as they are arriving and continues blooming until late autumn. I've been watching for the first blooms to open any day now and to see the hummingbirds here very soon.

One of my very young (and somewhat out-of-range) Aesculus is just beginning to bloom right now but I haven't seen any 'action' there--and the blooms aren't read as I had expected.

I have Monarda and Lobelia but they are a long way from blooming.

The Spigelia that I stared last year do not seem to have made it through the winter, but I think they'd be blooming soon if they had. . .
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Old 04-15-2010, 09:45 PM   #12
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I think I've read Lonicera sempervirens is an important early nectar source for hummingbirds and relies on them for pollination (not bees). Here in GA they have already been in full bloom mode for about 1 1/2 weeks!
will-o-wisp, what honeysuckle vine do you grow that blooms late in the season? just curious...I would like to grow one that blooms later in the season. I've read the major wheeler variety reblooms off and on during the summer.
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Old 04-16-2010, 12:36 AM   #13
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I have Monarda fistulosa and bradburiana. You're right. Neither one of them bloom early but then we don't start seeing hummers around here until later. We're pretty far north. Fun video Gloria.
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Old 04-16-2010, 08:28 AM   #14
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You might consider Ceanothus americanus ( New Jersey Tea). This isn't a nectar plant, but they collect small insects from the blooms for young. I have seen them at my Aquilegia canadensis (Wild or Canadian Columbine). That is the earliest bloomer I have seen them on in my area of IL.
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:52 PM   #15
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I'm not positive but.... I think I saw a ruby throated zing through my Virginia bluebells. The bluebells are in full bloom and have been for a few days already. They're an early bloomer.
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Old 04-19-2010, 05:28 AM   #16
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I'm taking notes of all the suggestions and using the rubythroat site for additional information. Thanks all.
I am hoping that massing plants will help attract earlier hummers. I moved a monarda didyma to the rain garden so it will bloom in the same area as the cardinal flowers.
I was wondering if there is a suggested number of plants, like the 10 milkweeds recommended for monarchs, needed?
This is also the first year I have 3 silene virginica starting to bloom now along with the columbine. These may or may not be native for me depending on the reference.
I'd like to plant some jewelweed with those.
For my neighbor I think I'll suggest a Lonicera sempervirens underplanted with the native columbine, monarda. and maybe Salvia lyrata. Any others he absolutely needs?
I'll also look into a native azalea for NJ. I want easy to grow and maintain plants for him since he is interested in hummers but a minimal gardener.

The long blooming Lonicera sempervirens I have are Blanche Sandman (red) and John Clayton (yellow).
If they are in the sun they bloom, on and off from spring to fall. If placed in the shade they only bloom in the spring.
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Old 04-19-2010, 07:57 AM   #17
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I have a native azalea that is lovely and so fragrant that I just take in deep breaths anytime I'm near it (while it's blooming). There are three of them planted right next to a Chionanthus, outside my daughter's window--she wanted fragrant natives there. They should be blooming very soon now!

The particular azalea I have is 'Marydel' (found on the Eastern Shore, where I grew up) and this link also suggests a native azalea that, while not fragrant, is attractive to hummingbirds:
Native Azaleas
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Old 04-24-2010, 04:01 AM   #18
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Hey Teresa, I actually do have the same azalea, Marydel, as you do. You're right it does smell heavenly. It must be wonderful to have 3. Does the Fringe tree bloom at the same time as the azaleas?
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:05 AM   #19
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hummer Native Plants that will attract Hummingbirds

We have hoards of Hummingbirds here all season. Wild Lupine- Lupinus perennis, Alum Root-Heuchera richardsoni, Lanceleaf Coreopsis-Wild Geranium-Geranium maculatum, Foxglove Beardtongue-Penstemon digitalis, Royal Catchfly-Silene regia, Cardinal Flower-Lobelia cardinalis, Spotted and Yellow Jewelweed-Impatiens capensis, Great Blue Lobelia-Lobelia siphilitica, Swamp Mallow-Hibiscus militaris, Common Milkweed-Aesclepias syriaca, Wood Mint-Mentha arvensis, False Dragonhead-Physotegia virginiana, Wild Petunia-Ruelia humilis, Prairie Phlox-Phlox pilosa, Turtlehead-Chelone glabra, New Jersey Tea-Ceanothus americanus. All of these will do well in New Jersey.

Howard
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:38 AM   #20
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Howard,

Do you have all these concentrated or large amounts massed together? I have at least four of the species you mentioned that I've never seen a hummingbird use. It is possible it happens where/when I don't see it. I do often see hummingbirds using Cardinal Flower.

Thanks. -- Lori
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