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Old 02-23-2010, 04:29 PM   #1
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Default Sacred Sites Act as Wildlife Sanctuaries

Sacred Sites Act as Wildlife Sanctuaries
Hallowed grounds the world over are becoming refuges for a variety of threatened species.
By Jessica Marshall | Thu Jan 14, 2010 07:00 AM ET

Sacred Sites Act as Wildlife Sanctuaries : Discovery News
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For all their creepy critters, the caves play a crucial role in preserving biodiversity against the threats of agricultural encroachment and illegal logging, thanks to their sacred status among the local ethnic groups.
The site's significance to the local population provides unofficial protection, and new research shows that the area is home to large numbers of plants and animals, including several threatened species.
"There's accumulating evidence from around the world about how important sacred sites are for conservation," said Jan Salick of the Missouri Botanical Garden in Saint Louis...
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:30 AM   #2
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Not surprising at all. Lots of old cemeteries are refuge to threatened and endangered prairie and savanna species. I can think of a few that have tall grass prairie remnants.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:22 PM   #3
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Not surprising at all. Lots of old cemeteries are refuge to threatened and endangered prairie and savanna species. I can think of a few that have tall grass prairie remnants.
Where?
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:14 PM   #4
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Quick search pulled up this, The Tallgrass Prairie in Illinois. I've visited two of those locations but.... I've visited others that aren't on the list that would drop your jaw to the ground. When the kids were little one of my favorite places to take them was to cemeteries.... you can let them run their fingers on the angels on the gravestones and they're free to pick up the stones people leave, they can play chase and hide and seek, there's usually a fence surrounding all the graves so it's not like you have to be on your toes watching them chase after balls and best of all.... you won't have any competition from other parents with kids. If you ever come to Illinois.... I'll take you to my secret places. Another good place for remnants would be Indian Reservations. Just always ask permission first. If it looks like it's a ghost town and there's nobody to ask... leave and come back another day.
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:07 AM   #5
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One placed hardly sacred but almost entirely untrodden is the Korean DMZ. There some of the worlds most endangered birds, mammals and plants are thriving, serving as a laboratory for the deleterious effects of man on nature. It serves also, I suppose, to demonstrate that some good can be found in most anything... here's a report on the place:

Relatively untouched DMZ is home to a number of natural wonders - News - Stripes
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act, agricultural encroachment, caves, conservation, conservation benefits, habitat protection, illegal logging, preservation, preservation benefits, protection, protection for native species, sacred, sanctuaries, sites, threatened species, wildlife

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