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Old 04-18-2014, 07:31 PM   #41
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I have many varieties of the daisy type plants. All volunteers. The ones that bloom in the spring are fleabane? I have one that has buds now. It has a little pink in it. The daisy flowers that bloom in the fall are asters? The ones with small white petals with a yellow center, the volunteers, look the same spring and fall.
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:47 PM   #42
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I have many varieties of the daisy type plants. All volunteers. The ones that bloom in the spring are fleabane? I have one that has buds now. It has a little pink in it. The daisy flowers that bloom in the fall are asters? The ones with small white petals with a yellow center, the volunteers, look the same spring and fall.
I'm inclined to say yes, but we'd need pictures to be sure.

The daisy fleabane (Erigeron spp.) are annuals. They seem to bloom most of the growing season...I even wonder if they seed themselves and have more than one generation throughout the growing season. I am not really sure. I know I see them in the spring and again in the fall. Summer too, I think, but they seem their best in spring and fall.

Asters are also composites (daisy-like with the yellow center comprised of multitudes of tiny flowers) too, like the fleabanes. Someone correct me if I'm wrong...I am not sure of the formal definition of "composites". I think of asters as fall blooming, but there are so many varieties, I am not sure how many may begin blooming before the fall.

I'm glad you have so many volunteers. Our property had at least three species of asters appear on it when I stopped mowing. I planted at least two more species, and I want to find more to add.
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Old 04-19-2014, 06:33 AM   #43
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Mouse ears...I would have told you coreopsis but the coreopsis mouse ears are yellow!
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Old 04-19-2014, 07:49 AM   #44
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I appreciate the help. I think I have fleabane but they only bloom in the spring. Does anyone know if there are daisy type flowers that are not native?
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Old 04-19-2014, 08:40 AM   #45
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Well, ox-eye daisy is definitely not native, it's European. It's the typical flower you think of when you say daisy. We have it scattered in our field but let it stay. I cut it to add to bouquets.
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Old 04-19-2014, 01:38 PM   #46
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Most native asters bloom later, some as early as July though. Fleabane usually has a lot of fine petals, and even the finest aster petals are larger.

Asters of New England

C
hamomile is also daisy like.

"Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron strigosus) resembles Annual Fleabane (Erigeron annuus), but robust specimens of these two species are fairly easy to distinguish. Daisy Fleabane has fewer and more slender leaves than Annual Fleabane, and the hairs along its middle to upper stems are short and appressed, rather than long and spreading. Another species, Marsh Fleabane (Erigeron philadelphicus), differs by having slightly larger flowerheads with more ray florets (100-300), and wider leaves that clasp the stems. In addition, Marsh Fleabane has only spreading hairs along its stems."

Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron strigosus)
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Old 04-19-2014, 07:42 PM   #47
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thank you linrose and rockerboo
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Old 04-19-2014, 09:47 PM   #48
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Explore Cornell - Home Gardening - Flower Growing Guides - Growing Guide

This says that daisy fleabane if perennial. I found out that my pink plant is daisy fleabane. They can be many different colors.
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Old 04-20-2014, 07:22 AM   #49
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EllenW, in that post its Erigeron speciosus compared to the more common Erigeron strigosus. Both have the Daisy Fleabane common names. Looks like a tiny New England Aster.
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:00 PM   #50
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Explore Cornell - Home Gardening - Flower Growing Guides - Growing Guide

This says that daisy fleabane if perennial. I found out that my pink plant is daisy fleabane. They can be many different colors.
Thanks for that link EllenW- I have always looked at Cornell as a bird ID guide. It's nice to know they have Information on Flower and Vegetable Gardening. Really easy to Navigate too.
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