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Old 08-23-2014, 09:06 PM   #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EllenW View Post
Wood aster
I always liked those "gap toothed" flower.
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Old 08-25-2014, 08:47 PM   #232
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I think th variation in timing of blooms is interesting. I have two kinds of iron weed, and both have already gone to seed. Most of my goldenrods are just starting, so unlike linrose, mine are out of synch. My Boltonia just bloomed, much later than last year, and my white wood asters, but the rest of my asters aren't ready yet. I still have several kinds of silphium and also woodland sunflower blooming.
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Old 08-25-2014, 08:55 PM   #233
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My white wood aster is blooming now along with two other asters--my New England aster just started..it seems a little early to me. Several other aster species won't likely bloom until a lot later...some as late as October.
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Old 08-25-2014, 09:28 PM   #234
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I have seen some goldenrod in the area blooming but mine isn't yet. I also have a tall non wild type of goldenrod that is beautiful when it blooms. I have been watering it along with anything in bloom or getting ready to bloom.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:42 PM   #235
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Cool, Ellen. There are many species and they have a wide range of blooming times. The first one to bloom here is actually my favorite...however, the pollinators seem to favor the tallest one...not my favorite, but it can stay in the borders and any spot where it looks good. From what I can see I must have at least five or six different species of Solidago.

Equilibrium seemed to think I had a bit too much...but, I'd much rather that than the mugwort. As I put in my native meadow, I will likely not include goldenrod to the areas I smother and seed...it can come in on its own--My goal is to keep as much biodiversity as I can...there will always be a place for goldenrods here...I'll just have to make sure it doesn't get to the point of being nearly a monoculture.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:43 PM   #236
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Some of mine started blooming about a month ago...some are blooming now, and others will likely bloom into early October.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:05 PM   #237
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Wow, You must have a lot of goldenrod dap if equil thought you had too much. I only have a little here and there. I would like to have more.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:35 PM   #238
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I *think* it was because I had little else to go with it. Luckily there are several species of aster too. These and the Solidago were all volunteers...but I did add some New England asters to go with them...and some other flower species...but until I get the native grasses, sedges, and rushes...and some more wildflowers with a succession of blooms.

Whatever the case, I'm happy to have them and see the myriad of pollinators that it attracts.
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:50 AM   #239
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Goldenrod is part of succession, and hosts the most insects of all native genus of herbaceous plants. Goldenrod usually comes in first because of the ease of germination, floating seeds, and less predation from mammalian herbivores. Then trees or grass come in and it becomes less persistent. This is why old fields of under-managed land gets filled with goldenrod, until native grasses or trees take over. Lack of natural grassland/forest near fields can also give rise to goldenrod, which can persist through heavy management.

Also goldenrod puts out allelopathy into the soil with prevents others from growing (even invasives), so this can be used partially as a management tool.

So don't be too worried about too much goldenrod, its all part of the process.

Blue Jay Barrens: Goldenrod Forest
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Old 08-27-2014, 07:23 AM   #240
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Very interesting dap and rocker.
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