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Old 01-08-2012, 01:15 PM   #11
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We seem to be skipping winter this year in NC. With only a few days exceptions, our temps have been in the 50s and 60s. It was 66 yesterday, in January! Very different from last year, when it had snowed five times already ahd we had weeks in the 30s.
What are your typical winter temperatures? Was last year's five snowfalls above normal for you?

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I enjoy my four seasons here, but wouldn't want to live much farther north than this.
I like my four seasons too (again I prefer winter to be *shorter*)...I don't want to move again, but I wouldn't want to go much farther south--maybe North Carolina would satisfy my desire for a shorter winter, but I'll likely never find out. In the mean time, I'm just enjoying being half-way through the period we normally get winter weather without really seeing much of it at all.
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Old 01-08-2012, 01:43 PM   #12
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After the Christmas decorations are put away, the kids have gone back to their lives in various cities, the linens are washed and folded, the house is clean and back to normal again, then I sit down with a cup of tea and enjoy planning for the new planting season ahead. My youngest just left today so I'm ready to start!

We're having a similar winter to yours turttle, I don't mind it at all! I did a walkabout this morning and the newly planted trees seem to be doing OK, the buds look good and I don't see any withering twigs. The prairie bed is sleeping under wind blown leaves, seed stalks still standing waiting for me to come harvest any seeds that still might be in the pods for winter sowing. If I get too lazy to do so at least the birds have plenty to eat.

I saw a bluebird this morning, I haven't seen one around since mid-summer. I'm happy we have them living here year round. Perhaps they are roosting in the nest boxes at night. I've been keeping a shallow dish of water on the deck for birds and we get a lot of visitors there. The feeder is nearby and I usually have to fill it every day. I had a platform feeder, mostly for the cardinals, but the squirrels drain that way too fast so I gave up filling it. The cardinals really don't like the tube type feeders but that's the only one that is squirrel proof. The juncos and towhees like to feed off the ground too so I do sprinkle a little around on the deck bench after I fill the feeder.

Back to white spring blooming trees, beside Shadbush and Fringetree there are the dogwoods of course, Cornus florida and Cornus alternifolia, Flowering and Pagoda dogwoods. Cratagus phaenopyrum, Washington Hawthorn. Halesia carolina, Carolina Silverbell. Magnolia virginiana, sweetbay Magnolia. Prunus virginiana, Chokecherry. And Oxydendrum arboreum, Sourwood as turttle mentioned, beautiful, I wish I could grow it here, I have trouble with ericaceous plants.
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Old 01-08-2012, 01:54 PM   #13
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Sourwood blooms in the summer here, if memory serves.
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:04 PM   #14
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If my memory serves, I'm beyond sourwood's northern limit.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:31 PM   #15
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Yes, June/July, sorry, I was just thinking of white blooming trees, you are right Rebek. Still I wish I could grow it.
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:05 PM   #16
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I thought perhaps they bloomed earlier in the South. I've never tried sourwood, but a friend a few miles away has one in her lawn strip. It's been there for something like fifteen years, despite being only a foot or two away from a sidewalk and street that get salted in the winter.
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:24 PM   #17
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I was thinking sourwood to when I read this post.

"If my memory serves, I'm beyond sourwood's northern limit."
I'm pretty sure sourwood reaches up into at least southwestern PA.

Some fun facts about Sourwood it is the largest member of the Blueberry family(Ericaceae). It is sought after by beekeepers because bees feeding on sourwood make some of the highest quality honey.
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Old 01-08-2012, 07:15 PM   #18
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"If my memory serves, I'm beyond sourwood's northern limit."
I'm pretty sure sourwood reaches up into at least southwestern PA.
Alas, I'm in northeastern PA.

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"
Some fun facts about Sourwood it is the largest member of the Blueberry family(Ericaceae). It is sought after by beekeepers because bees feeding on sourwood make some of the highest quality honey.
Cool. I am not too familiar with the plant, but that should not surprise me. Thanks for sharing.
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