Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Welcome To The Wildlife Gardeners Forum! > Photo of the Month > Wildlife Photo Tips

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-31-2009, 09:18 PM   #11
Naturalist/Photographer
 
Dave Stiles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Olympia, WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggyNoLia View Post
If I had a setup like that it would be months before anybody saw me. Wonderful videos and thank you for sharing them.
The only drawback to the system is that it sucks batteries dead real quick in the winter...
__________________
~ A good wildlife photographer studies everything about the animal before ever setting out with a camera in hand... ~
= = = = = = = = = =
Dave's Wildlife Photography - http://www.flickr.com/photos/dave_stiles/
Dave Stiles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2009, 09:25 PM   #12
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Stiles View Post
The only drawback to the system is that it sucks batteries dead real quick in the winter...
<Great Big Smile> I live in the south.....
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2009, 03:48 AM   #13
Big Fat juicy WORM
 
doccat5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Default

As soon as I find that grow your own battery tree, I'll swap ya for some of the money tree seedlings, k?
__________________
Earthworms are the intestines of the soil. ľAristotle
doccat5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2009, 01:57 PM   #14
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doccat5 View Post
As soon as I find that grow your own battery tree, I'll swap ya for some of the money tree seedlings, k?
That sounds like a deal.
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2009, 05:41 PM   #15
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

If either of you finds an invasive variety, your buddies here will help you deal with the little culprits!
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2009, 12:18 AM   #16
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by biigblueyes View Post
If either of you finds an invasive variety, your buddies here will help you deal with the little culprits!
Why of course. We'll need all the help in keeping it contained.
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2009, 04:23 PM   #17
Heron
 
joepyeweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Central Illinois
Default

If you've ever noticed the really large long lenses are typically accompanied by a sun shield - another long black tube mounted on the end of the lens.

You can mimic this for a digiscope, with a thin piece of cardboard, painted black, rolled to fit your lens.

When shooting birds, its best to position the sun at your back...
joepyeweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2009, 07:08 PM   #18
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by joepyeweed View Post
If you've ever noticed the really large long lenses are typically accompanied by a sun shield - another long black tube mounted on the end of the lens.

You can mimic this for a digiscope, with a thin piece of cardboard, painted black, rolled to fit your lens.

When shooting birds, its best to position the sun at your back...
The Celestron scope I'm using already has the extra long lense tube, but thank you for mentioning that. It may not be a bad idea to play with extending it a little further.

When I am shooting I try my best to follow the rules for composition, but there are times when your options are limited. I do what I can in those circumstances. I've learned to take chances. Some of them have been my best surprises.
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2009, 03:21 PM   #19
Heron
 
jpdenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Tinley Park, Illinois, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggyNoLia View Post
I'm using a Celestron Vistapix IS70 digital scope. About the only thing that I see that I can change from automatic is the exposure value. I fiddled with it taking shots under different values and it seems the glow still lingers in any picture with sunlight. Am I missing something? Can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong.

The digital scope in question can be found here http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=30&ProdID=417

Below is an example of the glow that I am talking about. You can see the bluish hue along the edges of his chest, the rounding of the tail feathers, and going up the right side of the eagle as well. I just want to know if I am doing something wrong or am I expecting more than the scope can do?
That's what is called purple fringing, and happens usually in high contrast situations, such as when you're shooting a dark subject against a bright sky. It's being caused probably by the overexposed sky. I suspect that's the main situation where you see this, right?

The purple fringing can be due to the sensor, specifically the microlenses on the sensor, which is what yours appears to be.

I did a quick search for user reviews of the camera and I see others are having this problem with it in bright light too. You need to learn to recognize the conditions where this occurs and try to avoid them, that's about your only option that I can see, short of getting a different camera.

John
jpdenk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2009, 03:44 PM   #20
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdenk View Post
That's what is called purple fringing, and happens usually in high contrast situations, such as when you're shooting a dark subject against a bright sky. It's being caused probably by the overexposed sky. I suspect that's the main situation where you see this, right?

The purple fringing can be due to the sensor, specifically the microlenses on the sensor, which is what yours appears to be.

I did a quick search for user reviews of the camera and I see others are having this problem with it in bright light too. You need to learn to recognize the conditions where this occurs and try to avoid them, that's about your only option that I can see, short of getting a different camera.

John
Hey John, thanks for the response. I do try to avoid it when I can, minimizing the sky behind the subject and so on. I've also found that keeping an umbrella over me helps somewhat. I haven't tried making a sun shield for
it yet...mainly because I got a 'different' camera this past year...but this one still has it's place....until I can afford a lense longer than 400mm.
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
glowing, picture

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2