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Old 10-06-2009, 10:28 AM   #11
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Sure, most photo editing programs will let you straighten the image. If you have to rotate a LOT, this can cause some loss of sharpness, so make sure you work on a copy of the photo. If you lose some sharpness, you can usually re-sharpen with another command, but that should be done sparingly.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:08 PM   #12
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Is that what that thing is that moves in the corner of my camera screen. A histogram.
I just started playing around with those last week as I was having a hard time capturing the reds in a cardinal flower in the manual setting.
I found out if I change those two manual settings here there and everywhere I will eventually get something right and actually get those true colors.
Like you say after about 50 shots or so........I'll keep this for later viewing..... Thank you!

For those of you that don't know........
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Crap!!! I didn't mean to open this thread. I wanted to save it so I could find it to watch the videos again.
To save a thread you don't post in just click onto the journal tools above and subscribe to it ...........Make sure you click on add subscription in the next box it pulls in also. It should say your subscription has been added if you did it correctly.
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Old 10-12-2009, 11:41 AM   #13
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I finally relocated this info to review.
I had no idea what that moving thingy was for before viewing these.
He sure explains it all very well. Just farting around with my camera to see what does what.
When you talk about lenthening or reducing exposure is that the same as setting the shutterspeed I see in my viewfinder?
What is the ISO setting you are referring to? I don't see it in my set up menue........
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Old 10-12-2009, 12:21 PM   #14
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Photography is about the amount of light that reaches the medium (film or digital sensor). There are 3 basic factors that come into play:

1. Shutter speed. The amount of time that the shutter is open allowing light to pass through to the medium. The slower the shutter speed, the more light passes through, but the more susceptible to camera shake.

2. The aperture. The width of the lens' iris or diaphragm ... a small aperture (represented by a large number) will let less light in than a wide aperture (small number).

3. The ISO. This originally was determined by the "speed" of the film: ASA 64 like the famous Kodachrome slide film was very "slow" film because the film grain was small. The silver particles, which are the light sensitive part of film, were ground up small so that the images were not grainy. "Faster" film (more sensitive to light) uses larger silver grains, which makes images more grainy. Now that most of us use digital sensors, we don't have to deal with the grain of silver particles, but it is still true that using a higher ISO setting (usually found in your camera's menu for settings) yields a more grainy image.

So cameras, when on an "auto" or "programmed" setting usually try to balance all of these factors to a medium setting.

Most cameras will allow you to set some values manually.
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Old 10-12-2009, 12:50 PM   #15
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So ISO is for cameras using film not the digitals........
My fujifilm does have a manual setting also.
I want to learn how to better myself because as I said before, the colors were off and I knew there should be a better way. So It's up to me to practice over and over again until it becomes natural and understood .
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Old 10-12-2009, 01:25 PM   #16
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Nearly all digital cameras do have an ISO setting that can be changed.

While it's true that higher ISO settings (typically 800 or 1600 and up) CAN be grainy (depending on the model and year of manufacture) newer technology is improving that all the time.

I'll typically use ISO 400 or 800 in low light or for fast moving subjects with no noticeable degradation.

Quietman

P.S. Havalotta: Check page 76 of your manual located here.
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Old 10-12-2009, 01:43 PM   #17
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They do?
I'll have to check my menu area again. Must have missed it?
Does that change how fast the photo is taken besides or along with altering the shutter speed?

See if I have this correct........The faster the film (The higher the ISO #'s) the bigger the particles are thus having larger air spaces between them creating a more grainy effect.

Do you always keep yours on 400-800?
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Old 10-12-2009, 02:01 PM   #18
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Right on the digital having an ISO setting. It began with film, but the setting has been retained in digital cameras so that people could continue to understand the light sensitivity of the medium (sensor vs film).

With film you were sort of stuck with the same setting for the whole roll of film. With digital, you can change the setting for every picture.

Hava, what is your camera model? I might be able to find where the setting is in the manual if they put it online.

Each of the 3 factors (shutter, aperture, and ISO) affect the exposure. HIgher ISO setting does make the sensor/film more sensitive to light, but does also increase the grain. My experience is not quite the same as Quietman's ... I find the grain noticeable at 400 and above. Very expensive cameras ... and ironically, some Fuji cameras ... are much better at reducing the high-ISO grain effect. Some software can do it too, but at the cost of sharpness.

The lowest ISO setting you can use is going to give you the sharpest picture.

Since digital is cheap compared to film, you can experiment with your camera by changing the ISO setting on identical compositions to see the different effects and whether ISO 400, 800, and above will be acceptable to you.

I keep mine on 200 usually for my point and shoot, and 100 on my DSLR. I like very sharp photos.
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Old 10-12-2009, 02:10 PM   #19
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For film cameras, it's not the spacing of the silver crystals, but thier size. Think about common table salt and powdered sugar. All the grains are touching, but you can actually discern the individual salt grains (especially with kosher salt!)

Changing the ISO on a digital camera changes the sensitivity to light. You can't see the relationship in AUTO mode. In program, or "P" mode, when you change the ISO, you can see your camera adjust the exposure depending on the ISO. A lower ISO, say 100, will have a longer exposure than the same subject and lighting with a higher ISO (shorter exposure)

I try to use ISO 100 or 200 in bright sunshine with a non-moving subject like a flower or a snag. If I am shooting a moving subject, or using a telephoto lens, or shooting in low light, I start to crank up the ISO

Check page 76 of the link I posted one or two messagea back to learn how to change the ISO for your camera.

Regards,

Quiet
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Old 10-12-2009, 03:14 PM   #20
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I do remember setting my camera to 10m at one point. (Don't recall where it is at the moment though)
They had told me that this would give me the best image but lessen photo storage on the chip which was fine by me.
Quality is better than quantity - but I do have that too !
Is that what you call the ISO area? No wonder I couldn't find it. Here I'm looking for the letters ISO. I guess I'm already set then..........
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