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Old 01-17-2009, 02:14 PM   #1
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This is a list of what I grew last year-
2 cucumbers
3 bell peppers
2 rhubarb plants
1 planter of mesclun
1 asparagus patch

If all goes well; I'd like to try chard, spicy bush basil, eggplant, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, beans and a few others next year while cutting back on tomatoes. I gorged on tomatoes the entire summer and am sort of tomatoed out if you know what I mean.


I forgot what I was supposed to be companion planting with my asparagus. Suggestions?

As an entry level veggie head, any other suggestions for easy to grow veggies in containers? The squash I know I can't grow in a container.
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Old 01-17-2009, 03:10 PM   #2
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Lorax,
I've heard that parsley can be a companion plant to asparagus. Never tried it myself. I just heavily mulch mine, and the asparagus pops up right through the mulch. After the asparagus crop finishes producing, the ferny tops leaf out and the shade seems to act as a natural weed deterent. I did plant my asparagus a bit closer together than recommended tho. I did it on purpose to choke out the weeds. As my asparagus bed fills in, I divide the roots and expand the bed. I don't put companion plants in my asparagus bed, because I think it would be difficult to wade through the bed to get at them.

Potted veggies that have worked well for me in zone 3/4 are cherry tomatoes and peppers. Also any kind of eating greens or bib lettuce (keep the potted greens in part shade/part sun). I think the potted peppers & cherry tomatoes do so well because it's kind of a "fake raised bed." The containers are in direct sunlight. In late spring and early summer in my region, the earth is still warming. I get a head start with the potted items. And I'm not talking fancy pots here...kitty litter and laundry buckets with holes drilled in them work just dandy.

I put in Rhubarb last year, so I'm anxious to see if that survived the winter here. Lots of insulating snow cover right now, so I have high hopes.

This summer my garden will be filled with cuckes and dill to make pickles. Also plan to do a lot of roma variety tomatoes to make sauce for canning and batches of salsa.

I've never done herb gardening before, so I want to experiement with that. I have done potted herbs in my unheated greenhouse, but I want to expand it to my garden area.

Never done spaghetti squash before, but since hubby is dieting and eating low carb, I plan to give that a try.

I did potatoes in a tub last year, but had only marginal success. Back to the garden for the tators.

I want to try lemon peppers in a hanging basket. Looked interesting on the web. We'll just call that my little gardening experiement.

I put up a new trellis for my grapes last fall. (see photo) I want to propagate more grape cuttings and expand my crop. I can a lot of grape jelly. We eat a lot of it, plus it makes a great gift item. I produced 40 pounds of grapes last growing season! Grapes should be picked at just the right time for the best flavor. Mo always lets me know EXACTLY when the grapes are at their PERFECT ripeness (see photo). If I don't heed her ripeness signal, she will eat the grapes faster than I can pick them.

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Old 01-17-2009, 03:20 PM   #3
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There is a specific parsley I want to try growing this year and I have seed for it. I don't know that it is for human consumption though but I can plant it in with my asparagus. There was something that I meant to remember that could go in with the asparagus and I can't remember what the heck it was and it's bugging me.

I used 5 gallon paint buckets with drilled drain holes in them. Nothing fancy for the tomatoes. I did have fancy concrete urns for my rhubarb. I have no idea whether those will survive or not. If they don't, I'll have to plant them in the ground next year to give them a fighting chance. Planting them in above ground planters wasn't one of my brighter moves.

Where's the web reference on lemon peppers in a basket if you have it?

I don't know if I have space for potatoes if I going to try squash. I'll have to see about that one.

I do have a lot of concrete planters left over to try veggies in.

Your grape trellis looks really nice. I have two grapes. I forgot what they were. They don't produce grapes. They're planted in too much shade. I suppose I should move them one of these days.

Totally off topic but I printed off your Baptisia alba seed pack and used it to share seeds with another member here. It turned out real nice. Thank you for making that for me. Got any colossal Italian tomato seed packs up your sleeve? I'm definitely growing those next year. They put beefsteaks to shame.
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Old 01-17-2009, 03:38 PM   #4
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Strawberries.
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Old 01-17-2009, 06:57 PM   #5
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Let's talk tater's shall we? LOL I grow mine on the ground. We will NOT be repeating the orange storm fencing again, that got very interesting, having to move it to add more leaves and straw.

Production was so-so this year, mainly because we got them in about a month late and we had some very heavy rain fall right before harvest. You could see the damp had caused a lot of problems. We'll move them to another area this year and try again.

We've had great success before, so I'm quite sure we'll get better production in another spot with better drainage. Taters do not like to get their feet wet.
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Old 01-17-2009, 08:36 PM   #6
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I don't have the space to grow potatoes. Maybe down the road you can help me set up a potato patch. I've never grown one before in my life. I have to start slooooooowly with veggies.

What was up with the orange storm fencing, were your tomatoes trying to attack your lawn and in need of restraint?
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:28 PM   #7
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Do you have a spare trash can? Garbage bag? That's really all it takes, add taters, soil, some leaves and make sure it's got good drainage. You won't get huge production, but you will get taters.
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Old 01-18-2009, 08:02 PM   #8
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Lorax, you don't really need a lot of space to grow potatoes. Just depth. Tires work well, heck, planting them in the ground works well. You just keep mounding them. Some people grow them in straw bales.
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Old 01-18-2009, 10:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
companion planting with my asparagus. Suggestions?

As an entry level veggie head, any other suggestions for easy to grow veggies in containers? The squash I know I can't grow in a container.
Companion plants for asparagus
http://www.ehow.com/how_2247924_use-...paign=yssp_art

I would imagine a single bush squash, such as zucchini or yellow straight/crook necks should work in a container if you remember to feed them extra - I believe they're "heavy feeders".
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Old 01-19-2009, 06:38 AM   #10
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You need to think carefully about what you're going to plant with the asparagus. You don't want to walk on the asparagus bed, you'll compact the soil if you do. Which defeats the whole purpose.
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