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-   -   Potatoes (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/vegetables-other-than-tomatoes/3891-potatoes.html)

THBFarm 11-03-2009 08:11 AM

Equilibrium, re: storing...if you have a cool garage that doesn't freeze in winter, you can put potatoes in layers in cardboard boxes, with each layer separated by newspaper, and store them in there....

biigblueyes 11-03-2009 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suunto (Post 47472)
I once made a red, white, and blue potato salad for a Fourth of July picnic...:D

What was the red - the skins or something else?

suunto 11-03-2009 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by THBFarm (Post 47926)
Equilibrium, re: storing...if you have a cool garage that doesn't freeze in winter, you can put potatoes in layers in cardboard boxes, with each layer separated by newspaper, and store them in there....

If you do this, be sure that your basement is mouse-free; otherwise, you may create a bed and breakfast for them!:drool

suunto 11-03-2009 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biigblueyes (Post 47932)
What was the red - the skins or something else?

It was a pink-fleshed cultivar called "All Red."

biigblueyes 11-03-2009 09:32 AM

That sounds like a fun salad. One to bring to a potluck.

Pahinh Winh 11-10-2009 09:45 PM

Potatoes
 
Hanh mitakuyapi. Equilibrium, potatoes like sand. Lots of good drainage. I grew up in potato country - it was an ancient lake bed. We grew semiloads of the things. Organic potatoes would be grown in sand (or on a pile of bricks - just so it drains) with organic fertilizer, very little nitrogen, lots of potassium, & at the end of season, lots of phosphorous to make the plants quit trying to grow & the tubers to get nice skins so they'll store well. Keep them far from apples or they'll taste 'off' & get green skins. Keep them from freezing or they'll get sweet instead of potato flavor - cold turns starch to sugars. We stored ours in layers of hay & maple leaves in bins lined with hay bales. You will learn the smell of rotting potatoes (nasty!), & get them out fast so they don't wreck the whole collection..
One way to grow potatoes is to add soil as the plants grow so the plants keep heading up & making more baby potatoes. They do OK in old tire stacks - fill an old tire with sand, plant the potatoes, when the plants peek 6-8" above the tire, put on another tire & fill with sand so the plants only peek out 1-2". You can go 3-4 tires high this way & they're easy to harvest at the end of the season.. just pull the tires off, which dumps the sand, & pick out the potatoes. If you try the tire stack, either paint the outside of the tires white or shade the tires so they don't cook the plants while you're growing your spuds.

Sage 11-10-2009 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pahinh Winh (Post 49220)
If you try the tire stack, either paint the outside of the tires white or shade the tires so they don't cook the plants while you're growing your spuds.

That struck me as kind of funny - growing pre-cooked potatoes! :frogtongue

Equilibrium 11-11-2009 01:19 AM

I've got a garage that doesn't freeze!!! It's rodent free too!!!

biigblueyes 11-11-2009 08:53 AM

Then all you have to do is grow more than you can eat - you've got a place to store them. When would you plant potatoes in Illinois- March and April?

Pahinh Winh 11-11-2009 01:56 PM

To Store Potatoes
 
Hanh mitakuyapi. Equilibrium, you must not have read my post - you should never stor potatoes in a cold place - the crisper is truly borderline - because the cold turns the starch in the potatoes to sugar & makes the flavor strange. Every variety turns a different kind of 'strange'.
To store potatoes, you need an insulated bin where the temperature stays between 45 - 50 F. Hay bales make a good bin - put a piece of plywood under the top one(s) to keep them from sagging is a good idea. Then you can chop the hay in the spring & use it for mulch. Bags of leaves work well, but you have to pack the leaves some or use lots more bags of leaves for the walls. Advantage here is lighter weight than bales, which run 50-60 lbs each & you have to find them. Many farmers don't make small square bales any more because no one wants to handle them; while bags of leaves are everywhere.
If you can pack maple leaves between your bags*/boxes of potatoes, they'll keep better longer. Maple leaves, not just any leaves. If you use bags, be sure they breathe or the potatoes will rot in no time. That lets out plastic bags of the usual kinds. If you sew, you can make bags from $1-table fabric - double the fabric & sew them up - there's no need to make drawstring casings.
Have fun..


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