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-   -   Potatoes (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/vegetables-other-than-tomatoes/3891-potatoes.html)

suunto 09-28-2009 05:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Equilibrium (Post 41009)
suunto> how much volume in potatoes could I expect to get from a 4 x 8 raised bed? And what else can be planted with a root crop so I wouldn't need to be weeding all the time? Biig> New Potatoes! That's it. That's what I was thinking. So what variety would I pick?

That of course will depend to some degree on you soil type and weather. If you plant a high-yielding cultivar, you have the potential (reality may differ!) for more than 50 pounds. I suggest trying Caribe, a beautiful purple/lavender-skinned white-fleshed cultivar, spaced 12" apart. You should need to weed only until the plants are about half-grown; they will quickly form such a dense cover that most weeds will be choked out. At the time you plant the potatoes (check with your county extension office for the best time for your area), you could try overseeding with a quick-growing spring crop such as radishes, lettuce, or mesclun that also might keep weeds at bay until the potato plants take over that chore.

Porterbrook 09-28-2009 07:15 AM

I grew Yukon Gold for the first time this year. They did surprisingly well. I dug a trench and worked in old composted manure; and then planted the potatoes in the bottom. As the potatoes grew, I kept adding fresh compost and mulch to make the hills around the plants. By adding mulch between the rows, weeds were prevented from growing. From a six foot by 10 foot bed, I harvested ten five-gallon buckets of potatoes.

suunto 09-28-2009 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Porterbrook (Post 41075)
I grew Yukon Gold for the first time this year. They did surprisingly well. I dug a trench and worked in old composted manure; and then planted the potatoes in the bottom. As the potatoes grew, I kept adding fresh compost and mulch to make the hills around the plants. By adding mulch between the rows, weeds were prevented from growing. From a six foot by 10 foot bed, I harvested ten five-gallon buckets of potatoes.

They did much better for you than they ever did for me; I found them to be relatively shy yielders compared with most other cultivars. My favorite yellow-fleshed cultivar for uniform size, taste, and yield, now is Carola (not be confused with the Japanese car...:tease).

Porterbrook 09-28-2009 04:50 PM

It could have been all that fresh mountain air!!! I live right along the Ohio River and have sandy loam for soil. If I can get the Carola seed potatoes, I will give them a try.

Equilibrium 10-10-2009 07:52 PM

suunto> I have never bought potatoes before. Where would I buy the Caribe?

suunto 10-11-2009 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Equilibrium (Post 43355)
suunto> I have never bought potatoes before. Where would I buy the Caribe?

Two sources that I have used are Pinetree Garden Seeds in Maine (https://www.superseeds.com/) and Ronniger Potato Farm in Colorado (http://www.ronnigers.com/id8.html); Ronniger has a much larger selection of cultivars, but Pinetree is less expensive.
Hope this helps...

suunto 10-28-2009 09:26 AM

Clamping Potatoes
 
3 Attachment(s)
Just FYI, here's a series of photos showing potatoes (Caribes) being put to bed for the winter. This process sometimes is known as 'clamping.' Basically, they're covered with about a foot of dirt, then plastic to keep out excess moisture, followed by more dirt to keep the plastic in place. One drawback to having soil too moist is that when it freezes, you may need a pickax to get at the spuds! :censored

Hedgerowe 10-28-2009 09:35 AM

That is very cool, suunto (and thanks especially for the photos--good illustrations). So you simply go out and unearth what you need, as you need it, throughout the winter, yes?

suunto 10-28-2009 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hedgerowe (Post 46575)
That is very cool, suunto (and thanks especially for the photos--good illustrations). So you simply go out and unearth what you need, as you need it, throughout the winter, yes?

That's it in a nutshell - I usually remove about a weeks' worth at a time.

THBFarm 10-28-2009 09:55 AM

Equilibrium, go for it, potatoes are one of the easiest crops to grow and it is soo fun to root through the soil digging for potatoes when they are ready to harvest...like an easter egg hunt :-)

I just buy a bag of organic potatoes at the farmstand every year and cut them into pieces and plant them.


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