Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Edibles Gardeners Unite > Vegetables other than tomatoes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-29-2009, 06:46 AM   #11
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Certified Naturally Grown in Ky Cherokee heirloom garlic
Bobbett's -- Naturally Grown Produce - LocalHarvest

Granny's Heirloom Seeds in MO
Grannys Heirloom Seeds - Garlic Bulbs/ Cloves

In Wisconsin
We grow great garlic in Wisconsin*
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 08:51 PM   #12
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

Thank you very kindly biigblueyes.

The Wisconsin grower's site is amazing.

I have no experience with garlic. Which three would be your top picks for a home grower? Is garlic able to be grown in a container?
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 09:15 PM   #13
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

It looks like garlic should do well in containers or raised beds - they like well-drained soil. Here's a video showing how to plant them in containers. He recommends you use a container at least 10 inches deep.

Planting Garlic in Containers - MonkeySee

We always used one kind of garlic that was handed down in the family. If I buy some (instead of asking the ex to share) I'll get a variety pack and see which ones I like the best.

I think "hardneck" varieties do well in the north.
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2009, 10:38 PM   #14
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

What's a hardneck variety???
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 07:19 AM   #15
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Growing Garlic in Minnesota

Hardneck varieties produce a flower stalk while soft neck varieties do not. . . characteristics can vary tremendously from one location to another. . . Climate can have a significant impact on garlic flower stalk formation as well as garlic taste. For example, a variety may be considered a softneck in one location, but in other locations it may produce a flower stalk. It is best to try out several different varieties/selections for a few years and select those that do best in your area.

Hardneck varieties (Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon) produce a flower stalk, or, technically, a scape, and are often termed "topsetting" or "bolting" varieties. The assumption is that they are most closely related to wild garlic. Flowers, if they are produced, usually abort and form "bulbils" instead. These are small, aerial cloves that have the same genetic make-up as the mother plant. They can be used for propagation, but the bulbs that are formed from bulbils are usually small the first year after planting. Two or three years are required before marketable bulbs are produced from bulbils. They are, however, an economical way to increase seed stock. Typically, hardneck garlic varieties have four to 12 cloves surrounding the flower stalk. Because of the hard flower stalk, they are difficult to braid. Another disadvantage is that some hardneck varieties do not store well and may either start to form roots or start to dry out within a few months after harvest. Typical hardneck varieties are: "Rocambole", "Purple Stripe," "Glazed Purple Stripe", "Marbled Purple Stripe", and "Porcelain". Other unique varieties that often produce a scape are "Asiatic", "Creole", and "Turban".

Softneck varieties (Allium sativum var. sativum ) do not produce a seed stalk. These are among the varieties that are commonly used in California for commercial mass production. There are, however, some softneck varieties that are suitable for cold climates. Softneck varieties are considered to be the most domesticated varieties due to minimal flower stalk and bulbil production. They are generally more productive than hardnecks because all the energy goes to producing a bulb rather than a bulb and flower stalk. In cold climates, however, hardneck varieties can be just as productive as or more productive than softneck varieties.In some softneck varieties a partial flower stalk may be produced and bulbils will form directly above the bulb. This will often occur in Artichoke varieties following winters with poor snow cover and below average temperatures. Each bulb of a softneck variety generally contains between 10 to 40 cloves arranged in multiple layers somewhat like an artichoke. Softneck garlic generally has a much longer shelf life than hardneck garlic and typically can be stored for six to eight months without significant deterioration. They also are easy to braid. Typical softneck varieties are "Artichoke" and "Silverskin".
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.

Last edited by biigblueyes; 09-02-2009 at 07:19 AM. Reason: spacing
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 07:22 AM   #16
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

The flavor of hardneck is claimed to be superior without so much heat. Softneck store longer, up to a year. If you want to braid, go with softneck. If you want the cool curvy flower scapes like havalotta has, go with hardneck. Hardneck are recommended for cooler climates, softneck for mild, but "try some of each the first year or 2" keeps coming up.
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 12:06 AM   #17
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Thanks for the explanation.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 12:11 PM   #18
Too Wild To Garden
 
Stoloniferous's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Default

Thanks for the idea! I just ordered garlic for my hubby. It'll be a surprise.
Stoloniferous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 05:37 PM   #19
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Happy hubby, and no vampires either. What a deal!
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2009, 02:40 PM   #20
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

My garlic is going to have to wait until next year.

I have so much on my plate this year.

I would like to know who has had success growing it in containers. I do have numerous 10" containers.
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
garlic, order, planting, time

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2