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Old 09-12-2013, 06:43 PM   #1
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Growing Cauliflower
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Growing Cauliflower - Bonnie Plants
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Cauliflower is a cool-season crop in the cole family (Brassica oleracea), which includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, collards, kale, and kohlrabi. However, it is more temperamental than its relatives. The trick to growing cauliflower is consistently cool temperatures, which is why almost three fourths of commercial cauliflower is grown in the coastal valleys of California. However, you can try growing it at home no matter where you live, but timing is important to catch the temperature just right. It also needs rich soil and a steady supply of water and nutrients.

Cauliflower likes temperatures in the 60s. In young cauliflower plants there is a fine balance between leaf and head growth. Any stress tips the balance toward premature heading, or “buttoning,” when the plant makes tiny button-sized heads.

This can happen when it’s too hot or too cold. This also happens if transplants sit in packs too long or if...
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:43 PM   #2
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Growing Cauliflower
This article was published originally on 2/28/1997
Iowa State University
Byline: by Linda Naeve, Department of Horticulture

Growing Cauliflower | Horticulture and Home Pest News
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Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea, Botrytis group) is also called "heading broccoli". It is a type of cabbage that originated in southern Europe. For many gardeners, cauliflower is one of the most temperamental crops to grow in the vegetable garden. Unlike broccoli which produces side shoots for additional harvests, there is only one opportunity for a good crop with cauliflower because the plant produces only one head. The head, sometimes referred to as a "curd", is formed from shortened flower parts at the top of the plant.

There are several reasons why cauliflower can be tricky to grow in a home garden - most of them due to environmental factors. Too much heat prevents the cauliflower head from forming. Cauliflower must be grown at a continuous, steady rate through it entire life, from seedling to harvest. Anything which slows or stops its growth, such as insects, lack of water, or excessive heat or cold, may prevent development of the head.

Some plants may produce heads prematurely on relatively small plants. This occurrence, called "buttoning", is frustrating to gardeners. It is caused by any type of stress that interrupts the plants growth. It often occurs when...
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:44 PM   #3
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University of Illinois

Cauliflower - Vegetable Directory - Watch Your Garden Grow - University of Illinois Extension
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Cauliflower is a cool-season vegetable and is more difficult to grow than other members of the cabbage family...

Broccoli, Cauliflower and Cabbage Not Forming Heads
Thrifty Fun
By Ellen Brown

Broccoli, Cauliflower and Cabbage Not Forming Heads | ThriftyFun
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My broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage have many large leaves and look very healthy. However they haven't started to form any heads. Have just large plants.

Hardiness Zone: 10b

Allene from Phoenix, AZ...
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Old 09-13-2013, 03:13 PM   #4
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hmmm, that's a lot of veggie posts - is "Staff" hungry?
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:01 AM   #5
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Growing Cauliflower
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Growing Cauliflower - Bonnie Plants
I grow cauliflower every year, but it is unusual when it forms a head here in Northern Mass. Instead, I grow it for its leaves, which I both juice or make green smoothies with. The leaves insure that, as with its sisters kale and collards, the drink will be teeming with nutrients. With a juicer (I use the Omega) or a blender (I use the Vitamix) one can make hay, so to speak, with all of the green leaves in this family of vegetables.

Green leafy vegetables are chock full of nutrients, so winding up with only cauliflower leaves is not a bad thing if one is open-minded in using them. Indeed, they actually taste good eaten right off of the plant, as do most organically grown raw vegetables.
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Old 09-15-2013, 11:18 PM   #6
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Still juicing, eh? I've been juicing on and off. I get a new recipe and get back into juicing then the machine sorta sits for a while until I get another new recipe or something else to juice. I didn't realize cauliflower leaves could be juiced so.... looks like I'll be juicing again soon as I bring in the last of the cauliflower.
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