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Old 06-10-2013, 06:24 PM   #21
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Well I never had any problem controlling mint, so maybe I will be okay with the sunchokes. They have their own little bed.

The only thing that I seem to have trouble controlling is cotton easter - now there is a plant - I worry about.

Yes, I am excited about it! So thanks for all your heads up and advice about it. Always good to know what I am getting into.
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Old 06-11-2013, 03:10 PM   #22
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Well, in that case, here is a link to recipes for everything from pickles to soup.

Jerusalem Artichoke Recipes - Sunchokes Recipes
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Old 06-11-2013, 08:23 PM   #23
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Thanks biigblueyes
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:21 PM   #24
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pawprint The Tomatillo is new for me

Anyone try growing anything new this year....-early-june2013-014.jpg I hope you can spot the little fruits & blooms on these volunteers. I think my wife, Destiny will become more happy with them growing in the tomato patch, once she has enough to make some homemade green enchilada sauce

Anyone try growing anything new this year....-early-june2013-015.jpg Another shot of the volunteer in my garden, I didn't know what the things were... growing among my tomato plants, and I have never had a Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica at my place before. I have no idea how they got there, but early on, I was hoping whatever this sturdy looking plant was, I welcome the shade for the nearby tomatoes & peas. I've already staked my tomatoes, but I may have to stake these things too.

ww
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Old 06-13-2013, 06:39 AM   #25
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I'm not familiar with the tomatillo at all.... Are you "sure" that is what you say it is?
I've had the Chinese Lantern Plants pop up unexpectedly..... They also look like that.

Are they one in the same or are they something entirely different?
I was always told.... The leaves and the berries of the Chinese lantern plant were poisonous being a member of the deadly nightshades.
If it is the Chinese lantern, it will take over your garden spreading via rhizomes.
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Old 06-13-2013, 06:58 AM   #26
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Tomatillos and Chinese lanterns are related. They are both in the genus Physalis.
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Old 06-13-2013, 07:26 AM   #27
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pawprint hummph~~well of course I'm NOT sure~~ yet!

...yanno Havalotta & Linrose, my first thought when I saw the hexagonal shaped things (they seem lightweight, hollow at this point) was 'hey those look like a chinese paper lanturn'. I then thought: nightshade/poison. ~~So NO I don't know what they are! I guess I'll go pick one & find out more about the things.

I have absolutely NO experience ID'ing Tomatillos, chinese lanturn, or nightshade plants. I haven't 'sampled' anything yet, these guys are fast too, one day they were not even there, and then poof next day they were a foot tall, then 3 more days and they are blooming and setting small funny looking fruit.

Thank you both for possibly saving my life, or at least not allowing my garden to get more over-run with some noxious weeds.

I think I'll go rip one out just to see what it looks like up close.

ww
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Old 06-13-2013, 08:22 AM   #28
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pawprint oh well maybe I will have 'chinese night lights' for the critterz

I've got rhizome heavy root!Anyone try growing anything new this year....-june132013-008.jpg Doesn't have an odor when sliced, but definitely growing from the heavy root, I'm sure these 'suckers' are inter-related via the rhizome root.

Here is one of those lanterns opened to reveal a seed filled berry.Anyone try growing anything new this year....-june132013-003.jpg

Anyone try growing anything new this year....-june132013-006.jpgNew discovery, while in the same area: found some sort of eggs, lizard or snake or whatever. I didn't dig these up, my 'night raider that likes to dig'- left this open this morning. Whatever my 'night raider' is, he likes the grubs found in the mulch, but he rarely ever harms a plant/root, and now I find, he stops when he finds a nest of eggs.

ww
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Old 06-13-2013, 08:36 AM   #29
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I ordered seeds for the tomatillo and have grown them a lot over the years. Then I too noticed that these things do grow wild in the fields around our house.

I have also grown Chinese Lanterns too.

Chinese lanterns has a bigger paper cover and it will turn orange (unless there is another variety?)

Tomatillo when they get ripe will open up and show the yellow tomatillo.

I stopped fooling with them because they are small, and collecting enough to eat is hard work and time consuming.
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Old 06-13-2013, 08:51 AM   #30
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pawprint I'm so glad I've got great helpers at Wildlife Gardeners

Hey Liquidambar, oh nice you have first hand experience also, with both the Tomatillo & Chinese Lanterns. hahaha I wasn't 'growing it on purpose', these things volunteered, and I was like: heyyyyyyyyy these things will help shade/support my tomatoes! (yes I have Poke growing among the tomatoes for same purpose+ food for birds~~~guess I didn't get all of the Poke root dug out a few months ago, because it is thriving right now...haha but the ones I did get out were huge thick things that smelled strong & good--yanno if you like the smell of Poke root!~~and I do~~)

I'm hoping these are Chinese Lanterns, as I would like to see one when it turns orange or red...yanno just for fun. Oh and the leaves and stems on this thing, are velvety smooth not rough at all.

ww
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artichoke, cantaloupe, gardens, growing, indian corn, new plants, potatoes, purple, red potatoes, watermelon, year

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