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Old 06-20-2012, 11:52 AM   #1
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Default As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis

Some much better photos of squash bugs than what I took at this site, Squash Bugs in Home Gardens. The eggs from my photo were destroyed by me or I would have for sure taken photos as they developed. Iím passing on chemicals. Seems easy enough crushing the eggs between my fingers and sucking up or squishing any adults I find. I am gonna try putting some newspaper underneath the plants to see if I can get more of the adults though.
--
I did find 1 that drowned in a bucket. Pity... not. Problem with leaving water out like that is that it drowns my bees and creates a breeding ground for skeeters. Anyone else have any creative non-chemical ways they deal with these native nuisances?
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As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9328.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9313.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9402.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9404.jpg  
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:16 AM   #2
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Supposedly Tansy is a good companion planting to deter both squash bugs and squash vine borers, but I haven't tried it yet since I think tansy also tends to get out of control and naturalize. . .

Read another suggestion recently about spraying the stems and underside of the leaves with a dose of BtK every week and injecting the stems with beneficial nematodes.

One of my books suggests soaking the seeds in kerosene before planting--thinking that might be a good experiment for the kids (soaked vs. unsoaked).

Any other methods out there?
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Old 06-28-2012, 10:17 AM   #3
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I'm still in the experimental stage, year two, but the hugelculture beds have been a boon in predator beetles that last year and so far this year has kept the squash bugs and borers at bay. Last year it was butternut squash only, this year it is summer squash. The tweetle beetle battle has begun...lol.
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Old 06-28-2012, 10:26 AM   #4
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A little late now but for future reference, plant a few squash early that were started indoors in paper . These will be sacrificial squash plants to attract the bugs. Slay bugs,start new plants.
At the organic display garden we tried using those white gauzy row covers early on until the squash began producing female flowers. Slowed the buggers down enough that the vines had produced roots along its length and was able to go on producing even with some bugs.
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:53 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
I'm still in the experimental stage, year two, but the hugelculture beds have been a boon in predator beetles that last year and so far this year has kept the squash bugs and borers at bay. Last year it was butternut squash only, this year it is summer squash. The tweetle beetle battle has begun...lol.
Which predator beetles help control borers? I'd love to have more of them in my garden....
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
A little late now but for future reference, plant a few squash early that were started indoors in paper . These will be sacrificial squash plants to attract the bugs. Slay bugs,start new plants.
At the organic display garden we tried using those white gauzy row covers early on until the squash began producing female flowers. Slowed the buggers down enough that the vines had produced roots along its length and was able to go on producing even with some bugs.
I have also started using row covers on my squash. But I'm nervous that the borers will just find a way under them. I pin the covers down with rocks. Should that be effective? How much will borers dig to reach plants, or are they easy to fool?

I'm also nervous about the potential arrival of cucumber beetles, which we had last year. However: we destroyed all the infected plants last year,and we abandoned that garden bed. The new bed is interplanted with many herbs and flowering plants and hums with bees and wasps. I hope that helps. I'm looking vigilantly but haven't seen any beetles yet. Fingers crossed.
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Old 06-29-2012, 12:39 AM   #7
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I'm not sure exactly what is going on that is controling squash pests in the hugelculture beds. Since some beetle predators are generalist and some eat small soil dwelling larvae and eggs I'm assuming it is more than plenty of moisture and nutrients. I have seen rove beetles and soldier beetles and spiders galore...so conditions seem to be helping somehow.

I did read that pink spotted ladybeetles eat the eggs and some pollen.

http://www.michiganorganic.msu.edu/uploads/files/31/Squash%20bug%20and%20Squash%20Vine%20Borer%20Contr ol.pdf

Quote:
For squash bugs, generalist predators include spiders, predatory
mites, disease organisms, and a number of beneficial insect species—especially ground beetles and robber flies.
At least one egg parasitoid of squash vine borer has been identified that helps to keep its numbers under control (8, 9, 23). Parasitic nematodes can be effective predators.
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Old 06-29-2012, 06:32 PM   #8
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Here's a link with a suggestion on how to control squash vine borers (and flea beetles):

Gardens Alive! - <b>Question of the Week</b> &copy 2012 <b> Mike McGrath</b>

Wonder if the plastic-jug barrier will work? It's worth a try at least.

Love the word 'pestiferous'!
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:55 AM   #9
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Teresa!!! I loved the idea for controlling eggplant flea beetles!!! I've been having problems with those and have resorted to rubbing them on the leaves. There's way too many of them for that to be effective though. I snitched the photo from your link because I think it could help!!! I snitched the photo for squash vine borer control too although I've been having good luck this year scraping their eggs off into a ziplock baggie!!! The adults take off on me before I can get near them with my cordless handvac but.... I've been getting the eggs so I'm a happy camper.
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As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-flea-beetle-protection-eggplant.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-squash-vine-borer-protection.jpg  
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Old 07-06-2012, 10:05 AM   #10
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Some more recent photos I took of squash bugs and squash bug eggs. I caught 1 in the act of laying eggs... it was fed to my chickens. I had misplaced my little ziplock baggie on the 2nd photo so I just put them on the edge of the veggie bed then smushed em with my finger. They do roll so you gotta be careful or you'll miss a few. The 3rd photo I took because the squash bug had laid her eggs on the surface of a leaf. They normally lay them on the undersides of leaves. 4th photo is of a baggie I was using to collect the eggs. Sometimes when they get stuck in the corners... it's just easier ripping out a little piece of the leaf. Last photo is some Dorking chicks. They like their squash bug egg "treats".
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As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9434.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9477.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9474.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9481.jpg   As if my squash didn't have enough problems already.... the squash bug, Anasa tristis-img_9475.jpg  

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