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Old 11-17-2011, 01:46 PM   #1
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Default The death of knowledge

The death of knowledge
Rural Revolution
In-your-face stuff from an opinionated rural north Idaho housewife.
Thursday, October 14, 2010

Rural Revolution: The death of knowledge
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But a snath is a critical part of what used to be an essential piece of equipment. It used to be that people could discuss snaths with great knowledge. They recognized how a snath had to confirm to a user's size, they knew how it had to have certain weight and materials properties, and they knew the merits of ash versus hickory snaths.

Okay, okay... I'll stop teasing and answer the question. A snath is…
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Old 11-17-2011, 02:19 PM   #2
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Not many people know how to live outside the current energy culture. But some do and that stored information is there for use. Nostalgia buffs have their place in a community...lol
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Old 11-17-2011, 06:11 PM   #3
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Shouldn't this thread be titled the Knowledge of Death? I bet the Grim Reaper knows a thing or two about a snath.

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Not many people know how to live outside the current energy culture. But some do and that stored information is there for use. Nostalgia buffs have their place in a community...lol
Yes, I guess they do...and now with the internet we'll have access to it--of course, when the grid is down and we might really need that knowledge, then what will we do?

...b-b-oo-ks?



...sorry, having another one of those weird mood days.
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:50 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Shouldn't this thread be titled the Knowledge of Death? I bet the Grim Reaper knows a thing or two about a snath.
Yes, I guess they do...and now with the internet we'll have access to it--of course, when the grid is down and we might really need that knowledge, then what will we do?
...b-b-oo-ks?
The internet also is a source for a lot of MISinformation; books often still are the best references. And as for snaths, I was able to find one at our local hardware store when I needed one!
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Old 11-18-2011, 03:25 PM   #5
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"The internet also is a source for a lot of MISinformation" Totally agree.
"as for snaths, I was able to find one at our local hardware store when I needed one!" Braggart!!! I swear I did know what a snath was only because I've got a scythe that needs repair and I'm hung up figuring out how to fix it since there's no snaths available anywhere local.
--
dappy> For what it's worth.... I don't think you're having a weird mood day... I'm thinking you're moving beyond normalcy bias is all. Floods and blizzards and tornadoes and hurricanes and wildfires and earthquakes sweeping our country oh my!!! Grocery stores wiped out... no generators or manual sump pumps for sale in a 200 mile radius... gas stations with no gas to sell... ERs with lines out the doors into the parking lots, images of looters out and about on the 10 o'clock news. What happened to all the folk in Massachusetts eats at me. It's probably been eating at you too. It's a reminder of what happened in the aftermath of hurricane Katrina. Many of the folk from MA went without power for weeks in Aug then again in October and last I heard there were still tens of thousands of people without power after 3 weeks. And remember those "rolling" power outages in states like TX>>>? With our economy in the condition it's in... I think it should be kinda obvious none of our grid's gonna get updated anytime soon so.... any of us could be next. A week without power’s no fun when it affects almost a million families but… it was an eye opener for us. After going without power for a week last spring when those storms came through, I realized exactly how "on our own" we could be. That's when I started thinking like you.... "and now with the internet we'll have access to it--of course, when the grid is down and we might really need that knowledge, then what will we do?"
--
So I did the obvious.... started working on a 3 mos "people" pantry instead of only a 1 month pantry, stockpiled 6 months of animal feed and bedding, figured out how to use my pressure canner so I wouldn’t lose everything bought on sale in my freezer if the power went out again, picked up another generator for the sump pump and a manual pump so we didn’t end up neck deep in water in our basement, stockpiled some propane tanks for the grill so we could cook our food, bought a crank radio so we could listen to what was going on, ordered up a 6 mos supply of all our meds and went through our medicine cabinet with a fine tooth comb purging what needed to go then replacing it, bought everybody a pair of glasses to back up their contact lenses, made everyone go to the dentist, then… bought a used wood burning stove and started gathering cords of wood.... who wants or needs the headache of a power outage in the middle of winter when pipes could freeze.... not me. It won't be toasty warm in here but we should be able to keep temps above freezing for at least a month so we wouldn't end up with tens of thousands of dollars of damage to our home from busted pipes. But what about the not so obvious.... things we take for granted because we don't realize how dependent we've become on all our "conveniences" like.... fresh water and clean clothes and popping food in a microwave>>>? So.... I started searching online and kept ending up at those tinfoil hat type websites where their survivalists "prepare" for every TEOTWAWKI scenario imaginable from Armageddon and alien occupation to societal collapse, nuclear war, and zombie apocalypses. Whatever. These folk are waaaaaaay out if left field IMO but…. they do have boatloads of really good basic preparedness information for normal folk just interested in natural disaster preparedness so I started lurking and downloading some of their free PDFs.. I started saving what I found to a memory stick AND printing it out... just in case. I mean... what's the cost of a coupla reams of paper and some black ink cartridges because you nailed it.... when our power's out.... there's no internet access and no access to our computer hard drives or printers. Books are good too... especially a decent illustrated first aid manual that’s current but taking a class at a local fire station or Red Cross would be even better for most I 'spose. Everyone should know basic CPR. I picked up a few books but found more practical information online for what's called SIP.... sheltering in place. SIP's more in sync with what I'm concerned about which is.... staying put in our own home so I can watch over our house and care for our animals during a natural disaster that knocks out the grid and communications. We did go with no internet for that week and no mobile phones either since the cell towers were affected and there were no cops in the area.... flood waters and downed trees pretty much cut off the roads. Our land line worked on and off believe it or not. Too bad the phones we had all required a power source.
--
So…. what did I end up saving and printing>>>? You name it. Lots of articles with detailed illustrations on how to avoid gm contamination when saving seed, loads of articles on organic gardening, how to garden without irrigation, how to clean fish, how to butcher and prep poultry and fowl, how to butcher and prep rabbits, how to butcher and prep venison, how to store just about anything, how to purify water, how to sharpen knives, what knives to use for what and how to use them properly which… prompted me to take a hands on class on kitchen knives where I really learned a lot, everything I could get my hands on covering homesteading, everything I could get my hands on covering backyard livestock management and care, recipes for cooking with pantry goods, recipes for household cleaners and detergents…. I even made some and started using them and have to wonder why I ever blew money buying commercially available brands with the way the homemade cleaning products work, everything on very basic self-defense, everything on basic electrical, basic plumbing, basic welding, basic carpentry, basic woodworking, basic metal working, basic electronics, basic wildcraft, how to choose the right tool for the right job, uses for baking soda, uses for vinegar, how to tap maple trees and make syrup, how to keep bees, everything aquaponics and hydroponics for fish, everything cheese, everything soap, everything candle, everything sewing without an electronic sewing machine or serger, everything kerosene, bicycle repair manuals and what spare parts to keep on hand, how to use manual tools and care for them, how to use and care for grain grinders, and… I’m sure I’m missing quite a bit I stashed for a “gridless” month but you get the idea because I’m pretty sure we could make it right here where we are for 3 months without ever having to step foot off the property once…. in the dead of winter without power and it wasn’t really that hard to do. We just had to start thinking differently and using what money we had wiser.
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Old 11-18-2011, 03:30 PM   #6
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Yes it does help to be self-reliant in case of a crisis, otherwise known as a power outage, and I used to be much more self-reliant than I am now. It all comes down to what you are used to, and yes we do get lazy and lapse into whatever is the easiest for us to streamline our lives. I used to use a scythe to mow and a woodstove to heat and cook and create the hot water in the house and a two person crosscut saw to cut our firewood for the year when I was younger and lived in New England. We found old tools at barn sales for next to nothing and instead of using them for decor, we employed them. We didn't have cable or satellite TV or computers with internet access. I had a huge vegetable garden and fruit trees and I canned and baked everyday. I even roasted a Thanksgiving turkey in that wood cookstove. We read a lot more and played music and attended a lot of community events.

Some have held onto those ways and I applaud them. Now when our power goes out we don't have a backup source of heat like a woodstove and I miss the TV and computer. The house sounds strangely quiet. After a few hours I start to appreciate what we have and what we lost and find ways to entertain ourselves and ways to remember what we did to survive when we lived on next to nothing and we made it work. Usually the guitar and banjo come out and we have a great time. Simplicity is a great thing, the temptation to leave it is even greater.
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Old 11-18-2011, 04:22 PM   #7
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dapjwy, you would be surprised what the people in your community know. Hikers, campers, hunters,even civil war re-enactors know stuff that would surprise you. I can build a shelter that will keep one out of the wet and wind just about anywhere. I have some reliable knowledge of edible foraging and make quilts and crochet. I never use chemical firestarters and can even create a spark without a match. I own hand cranked flashlights.
In the retirement community where my mother inlaw still lives ice storms regularly take out the power in winter. Her husband had a storeroom in the lower level of their home with dry goods for probably a year. Not a survivalist just a Sam's club nut...

No gas, we all own bicycles kept in good repair. And cross country ski.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:44 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your replies. I was away the past two days and just got home about half an hour ago. Will try to respond another time. For now, I just want to mention that I took a book out of the library as I'm trying to wean myself from cable. (We never had cable until we moved out here, and part of me says we should do without it again.)
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